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Latest House Items
  • Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., holds a copy of the U.S. Constitution during his mock swearing-in ceremony on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2011. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

    Constitution read for first time, but not in its entirety

    More than 200 years after the first part was written, the Constitution produced standing ovations and strident but respectful debate as lawmakers from both parties read the government's founding document on the House floor in its entirety — or nearly so.


  • ** FILE ** Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner listens to questions at a press conference during a meeting of the G-20 finance ministers and central bank governors in Gyeongju, South Korea, on Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    EDITORIAL: Only $279,950,956,705.59 left to spend

    Within the next few months, America will reach its credit limit. After blowing through $2.6 trillion in tax dollars, the government will only be able to charge a mere $280 billion extra to future generations - a horrifying prospect that has sent the White House into a panic. Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner yesterday urged Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Nevada Democrat, to restore the president's ability to spend beyond the nation's means. If the new Republican House majority concedes on this point, it will have lost the only hope of restoring fiscal sanity.


  • Only $279,950,956,705.59 left to spend

    Within the next few months, America will reach its credit limit. After blowing through $2.6 trillion in tax dollars, the government will only be able to charge a mere $280 billion extra to future generations - a horrifying prospect that has sent the White House into a panic. Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner yesterday urged Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Nevada Democrat, to restore the president's ability to spend beyond the nation's means. If the new Republican House majority concedes on this point, it will have lost the only hope of restoring fiscal sanity.


  • HAMMER TIME: Newly installed House Speaker John A. Boehner, Ohio Republican, displays the parliamentary gavel that he will wield in the 112th Congress, which convened Wednesday. (Associated Press)

    Boehner takes reins in House

    The 112th Congress gaveled open Wednesday with Republicans taking control of the House and immediately rewriting the chamber's rules, making it easier to cut spending and taxes, harder to add new spending, and more open to voters who want to keep tabs on what lawmakers are doing.


  • NEW MINORITY: Outgoing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California and outgoing House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland prepare Tuesday for changes on Capitol Hill. (Associated Press)

    House to vote on repeal of health care law

    It didn't save them from catastrophic losses at the polls, but Democrats say the nuts-and-bolts benefits already in place thanks to the health care law, such as coverage for young adults and people with pre-existing health conditions, will derail House Republicans' repeal efforts.


  • "It's not going to be easy; it's going to be a long, hard slog," said Rep. Steve King, an early leader in the repeal drive. (Associated Press)

    House GOP takes aim at health plan

    Eager to show who's in charge, the House's new Republican majority plans to vote to repeal President Obama's landmark health care overhaul before he even shows up in their chamber to give his State of the Union address later this month.


  • **FILE** Rep. Steve King (Associated Press)

    House GOP sending Obama a message on health repeal

    Eager to show who's now in charge, the House's new Republican majority plans to vote to repeal President Obama's landmark health care overhaul before he even shows up in their chamber to give his State of the Union address.


  • Cable TV dispute threatens Penn State-Fla. game

    Montey Chapel and his sons have a new flat-screen television and football-watching plan for New Year's weekend _ watch every bowl game.


  • Sen. Charles E. Schumer, New York Democrat

    Congress passes aid package for 9/11 responders

    After a last-minute compromise, Congress passed legislation Wednesday to provide up to $4.2 billion in new aid to survivors of the September 2001 terrorism attack on the World Trade Center and responders who became ill working in its ruins.


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