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Results from two undercover investigations at roadside zoos revealed inhumane treatment of tiger cubs exploited for photographic opportunities, indiscriminate breeding of tigers, rampant trade in cubs for public handling and dumping of the cubs once they were no longer profitable. The Humane Society of the United States conducted the investigations at Tiger Safari in Oklahoma and Natural Bridge Zoo in Virginia. These roadside zoos allow members of the public to pet, feed, pose and play with baby tigers for a fee. The investigations also provided a snapshot of the unfettered breeding of big cats for the exploitation of their cubs, the resulting surplus of adult big cats, and the animal welfare and public safety implications when large cubs are discarded after ceasing to be profitable. In this image, a capuchin monkey grabs the finger of a visitor at Natural Bridge Zoo. Inadequate public safety barriers that allow unmonitored access to animals is a violation of the federal Animal Welfare Act. (Michelle Riley/The Humane Society of the United States via AP Images)

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Results from two undercover investigations at roadside zoos revealed inhumane treatment of tiger cubs exploited for photographic opportunities, indiscriminate breeding of tigers, rampant trade in cubs for public handling and dumping of the cubs once they were no longer profitable. The Humane Society of the United States conducted the investigations at Tiger Safari in Oklahoma and Natural Bridge Zoo in Virginia. These roadside zoos allow members of the public to pet, feed, pose and play with baby tigers for a fee. The investigations also provided a snapshot of the unfettered breeding of big cats for the exploitation of their cubs, the resulting surplus of adult big cats, and the animal welfare and public safety implications when large cubs are discarded after ceasing to be profitable. In this image, tiger cub Deja chews on an exposed electrical outlet at Natural Bridge Zoo in between photo shoots with the public. (Michelle Riley/The Humane Society of the United States via AP Images)

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In a photo provided by the Humane Society of the United States from Wednesday, May 14, 2014, a dog is carried out of a suspected puppy mill in Howell, Mich. Officials say more than 90 dogs and puppies were removed Wednesday, May 14, 2014 from the site. Several agencies were involved in the removal of the dogs from the Howell-area property, about 45 miles northwest of Detroit. Investigators found large-breed dogs and puppies, mainly poodle mixes, living in what the Humane Society says were substandard conditions. The Humane Society says their fur was matted and untreated medical conditions were found, including dental and eye problems. (AP Photo/Humane Society of the United States)

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In a photo provided by the Humane Society of the United States from Wednesday, May 14, 2014, several dogs are penned at a suspected puppy mill in Howell, Mich. Officials say more than 90 dogs and puppies were removed Wednesday, May 14, 2014 from the site. Several agencies were involved in the removal of the dogs from the Howell-area property, about 45 miles northwest of Detroit. Investigators found large-breed dogs and puppies, mainly poodle mixes, living in what the Humane Society says were substandard conditions. The Humane Society says their fur was matted and untreated medical conditions were found, including dental and eye problems. (AP Photo/Humane Society of the United States)

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In a photo provided by the Humane Society of the United States from Wednesday, May 14, 2014, shows two dogs at a suspected puppy mill in Howell, Mich. Officials say more than 90 dogs and puppies were removed Wednesday, May 14, 2014 from the site. Several agencies were involved in the removal of the dogs from the Howell-area property, about 45 miles northwest of Detroit. Investigators found large-breed dogs and puppies, mainly poodle mixes, living in what the Humane Society says were substandard conditions. The Humane Society says their fur was matted and untreated medical conditions were found, including dental and eye problems. (AP Photo/Humane Society of the United States)

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In this March 25, 2014 photo provided by the Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society workers Rick Naugle, foreground and Kayla Gram, prepare to inject a tagged and tranquilized doe as part of a contraceptive program to control the deer population in Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. Organizers say harsh weather, red tape and the unpredictability of the animals all interfered with the program and they only managed to inject a contraceptive into eight does last month. An estimated 120 deer have overrun the two-square mile village, which has resisted any lethal method of culling the herd. (AP Photo/Humane Society of the United States, Yvonne Forman)

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In this March 25, 2014 photo provided by the Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society workers Kayla Gram, left and Rick Naugle take the measurements of a tagged and tranquilized doe as part of a contraceptive program to control the deer population in Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. Organizers say harsh weather, red tape and the unpredictability of the animals all interfered with the program and they only managed to inject a contraceptive into eight does last month. An estimated 120 deer have overrun the two-square mile village, which has resisted any lethal method of culling the herd. (AP Photo/Humane Society of the United States, Yvonne Forman)

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In this March 25, 2014 photo provided by the Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society worker Rick Naugle tags tranquilized doe as part of a contraceptive program to control the deer population in Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. Organizers say harsh weather, red tape and the unpredictability of the animals all interfered with the program and they only managed to inject a contraceptive into eight does last month. An estimated 120 deer have overrun the two-square mile village, which has resisted any lethal method of culling the herd. (AP Photo/Humane Society of the United States, Yvonne Forman)

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In this March 25, 2014 photo provided by the Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society workers Rick Naugle foreground, takes a deer’s vital signs as Kayla Gram prepares to inject a tagged and tranquilized doe with a contraceptive as part of a program to control the deer population in Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. Organizers say harsh weather, red tape and the unpredictability of the animals all interfered with the program and they only managed to inject a contraceptive into eight does last month. An estimated 120 deer have overrun the two-square mile village, which has resisted any lethal method of culling the herd. (AP Photo/Humane Society of the United States, Yvonne Forman)

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FILE - This July 16, 2004, file photo shows a gray wolf at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minn. The Humane Society of the United States and other animal welfare groups filed a lawsuit Feb. 12, 2013 in federal court in the District of Columbia to restore federal protections for gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region that were lifted last year. Turning 60 in 2014, the Humane Society of the United States has millions of supporters, about 630 employees, a budget of $170 million and a long list of successes that has improved life for millions of animals. (AP Photo/Dawn Villella, file)

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FILE - In this Jan. 25, 2014 file photo released by the The Humane Society of the United States, Gaff's or spurs in variations of cockfighting are wrapped around the legs of a rooster, in Andalusia, Ala. A cockfighting raid in Andalusia led to the discovery of dead roosters and the arrest of nine people. Turning 60 in 2014, the Humane Society of the United States has millions of supporters, about 630 employees, a budget of $170 million and a long list of successes that has improved life for millions of animals. (AP Photo/The Humane Society of the United States, Frank Loftus, file)

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FILE - In this March 2, 2014 file photo, James Cromwell arrives at the 24th Night of 100 Stars Oscars Viewing Gala at The Beverly Hills Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif. Cromwell will receive a lifetime achievement award from the Humane Society of the United States on Saturday, March 29, 2014, in Beverly Hills, Calif. "He's been a friend to the HSUS and to animals for decades. He is somebody who has used his fame and platform for farm animal protection, animals used and abused in labs, horses who are used for horse racing, you name it, if an animal is in trouble, he is there," said Michelle Cho of the HSUS. (Photo by Annie I. Bang /Invision/AP, file)