Topic - International Assistance Mission

The International Assistance Mission (IAM) is a non-profit Christian development Non Government Organization (NGO) working in Afghanistan since 1966. IAM runs projects in medicine, engineering, languages, small business and community development. In 2008, IAM's eighteen projects in seven provinces helped 370,000 Afghans.IAM is registered in Switzerland, and is the longest continuously serving NGO in Afghanistan and only works in Afghanistan. - Source: Wikipedia

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  • In this image made available by International Assistance Mission, Jawed, a 24-year-old Afghan from Panjshir province, the team's cook, one of 10 civilian volunteers killed in Afghanistan on Thursday, Aug. 5, 2010, is shown. The Christian charity IAM said Monday, Aug. 9, 2010 that it had no plans to leave Afghanistan despite the murders of 10 members of its medical aid team and repeated that the organization does not attempt to convert Muslims to Christianity. The 10 team members -- six Americans, two Afghans, one Briton and a German -- were gunned down Thursday, Aug. 5, 2010 after they were accosted by gunmen after finishing a two-week mission providing medical care to impoverished villagers in remote Nuristan province. (AP Photo/International Assistance Mission)

    Lone Afghan attack survivor tells story

    One of the gunmen who killed 10 charitable health workers in northern Afghanistan hitched a ride with the medical team shortly before the murders, the sole survivor of the attack told The Associated Press on Saturday.

  • Tom Little is one of the six American medical aid workers killed by the Taliban in Afghanistan's Badakhshan Province. All of the victims belonged to the humanitarian group International Assistance Mission. (Associated Press)

    Killing of aid workers will hurt Afghans

    The recent execution-style slaying of 10 medical aid workers, six of them Americans, by the Taliban in Afghanistan will hurt poverty-stricken Afghans the most and underscores the vulnerability of humanitarian groups, charities working in the region say.

  • Dirk Frans (center), director of the International Assistance Mission, talks to a journalist during a press conference in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Monday, Aug. 9, 2010. The Christian charity said it had no plans to leave Afghanistan despite the murders of 10 members of its medical aid team, and it repeated that the organization does not attempt to convert Muslims to Christianity. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

    Last 2 killed medical workers in Afghanistan identified

    A Christian charity said Monday it had no plans to leave Afghanistan despite the killings of 10 members of its medical aid team and repeated that the organization does not attempt to convert Muslims to Christianity.

  • A man walks out of the office of the International Assistance Mission on Saturday, Aug. 7, 2010, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Ten members of International Assistance Mission medical team, including six Americans, were shot and killed by militants as they were returning from a two-week trip providing eye and other health care in remote villages of northern Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Ahmad Massoud)

    6 Americans on medical team killed in Afghanistan

    Ten members of a medical team, including six Americans, were shot and killed by militants as they were returning from providing eye treatment and other health care in remote villages in northern Afghanistan, a spokesman for the team said Saturday.

  • In this undated photo released by David L. Evans, Tom Little, right, optometrist and team leader with the International Assistance Mission, watches as an unidentified doctor examines a patient in an Afghanistan clinic. Members of a medical team, including Tom Little, were shot and killed by militants as they were returning from providing eye treatment and other health care in remote villages in northern Afghanistan, a spokesman for the team said Saturday, Aug. 7, 2010. Tom Little, an optometrist from Delmar, New York, has been working in Afghanistan for more than 30 years, according to Dirk Frans, director of the International Assistance Mission. (AP Photo/Provided by David L. Evans)

    Afghan medical mission ends in tragedy

    Ten members of a Christian medical team hiked for more than 10 hours over rugged mountains — unarmed and without security — to bring medical care to isolated Afghan villagers until their humanitarian effort took a tragic turn.

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