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ISIL_20140916_006.JPG

A member of Code Pink interrupts Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel as he testifies along with Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey concerning the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in front of the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, September 16, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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ISIL_20140916_007.JPG

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, pictured, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey testify concerning the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in front of the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, September 16, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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ISIL_20140916_004.JPG

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey arrive to testify concerning the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in front of the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, September 16, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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ISIL_20140916_003.JPG

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey arrive to testify concerning the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in front of the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, September 16, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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ISIL_20140916_008.JPG

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, left, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Martin Dempsey testify concerning the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in front of the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, September 16, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Gen. Ray Odierno, Commanding General, Multi-National Forces-Iraq, and U.S. Army Lt. Col. Joseph McGee, Commander of 2-327 Infantry Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, walk through the streets of Samarra to visit the locals, on Oct. 29, 2008. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Kani Ronningen/Released)

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President Obama said Wednesday he had authorized U.S. airstrikes inside Syria for the first time, along with expanded strikes in Iraq, as part of "a steady, relentless effort" to root out Islamic State extremists. (AP Photo/Saul Loeb, Pool)

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A woman kisses her son outside the Mar Tshmony church in Erbil, Iraq, where 500 Christian families took refuge after an ISIS advance into Kurdish territory, mainly Qaraqosh, the “Christian capital of Iraq.” (Photo by Vianney Le Caer / Pacific Press/Sipa USA)

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In this image made through a window of the Oval Office, President Obama speaks on the phone to Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah from his desk at the White House ahead of his address to the nation tonight regarding Iraq and Islamic State group militants. (Associated Press)

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Obama Islamic State.JPEG-03281.jpg

In this image made through a window of the Oval Office, President Barack Obama speaks on the phone to Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah from his desk at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2014, ahead of his address to the nation tonight regarding Iraq and Islamic State group militants. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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The Long War.JPEG-08af6.jpg

FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 30, 2006 file photo, U.S. President George W. Bush speaks during a joint press conference with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in Amman, Jordan. Ibrahim Hooper, spokesman for the Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations, says the Islamic State group's ascension in Iraq could have been prevented if the U.S. had insisted on a nonsectarian Iraqi government, rather than the one led by the recently replaced al-Maliki that favored Shiite Muslims over the Sunnis. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

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Mideast Syria Airstrikes Analysis.JPEG-064e4.jpg

FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2014 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, before convening a meeting with his national security team on the militant threat in Syria and Iraq. The U.S. and its allies are trying to hammer out a coalition to push back the Islamic State group in Iraq. But any serious attempt to destroy the militants or even seriously degrade their capabilities means targeting their infrastructure in Syria. That, however, is far more complicated. If it launches airstrikes against the group in Syria, the U.S. runs the risk of unintentionally strengthening the hand of President Bashar Assad, whose removal the West has actively sought the past three years. Uprooting the Islamic State, which has seized swaths of territory in both Syria and Iraq, would potentially open the way for the Syrian army to fill the vacuum. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

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Illustration on consequences of the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

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Illustration on consequences of the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

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burdened: President Obama is facing calls from both sides of the aisle to up U.S. attacks in Iraq against the Islamic State after a second American journalist was beheaded on video by militants of the terrorist group. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

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FILE - This Aug. 28, 2014 file photo shows President Barack Obama speaking in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, before convening a meeting with his national security team on the militant threat in Syria and Iraq. President Barack Obama’s acknowledgement the U.S. still lacks a strategy for defeating the growing extremist threat emanating from Syria reflects a still unformed international coalition. The president will meet with his top advisers and consult members of Congress to prepare U.S. military options. At the same time, he is looking for allies around the world to help the U.S. root out the Islamic State group that has seized large swaths of territory in Syria and Iraq.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

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President Barack Obama leaves the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014, after speaking about the economy, Iraq, and Ukraine, before convening a meeting with his national security team on the militant threat in Syria and Iraq. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

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Ralph Weems, a 32-year-old Marine and Iraq war veteran, was in fair condition Monday, recovering in a Tupelo hospital after he was badly beaten. (Facebook/The Clarion-Ledger)

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National Edition News cover for August 27, 2014 - U.S. citizens joining Islamic State major threat to homeland: in this Monday, June 30, 2014 photo, militants from the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) celebrating the group's declaration of an Islamic state, in Fallujah, 40 miles (65 kilometers) west of Baghdad, Iraq. The militant extremist group's unilateral declaration of an Islamic state is threatening to undermine its already-tenuous alliance with other Sunnis who helped it overrun much of northern and western Iraq. (AP Photo)

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A convoy of vehicles and militant fighters move through Iraq's Anbar Province. The U.S. government is tracking and gathering intelligence on as many as 300 Americans who are fighting side-by-side with the Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria and are poised to become a major threat to the homeland, according to senior U.S. officials. (Associated Press)