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Jack B. Johnson

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson is scheduled for sentencing on Dec. 6. He faces up to 14 years in prison for accepting up to $1 million in bribes. (The Washington Times)

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Prince George's County Council member Leslie Johnson, wife of former County Executive Jack B. Johnson, leaves the U.S. District Courthouse in Greenbelt, Md., on June 30, 2011, after pleading guilty to corruption charges. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson speaks to the media outside the U.S. Federal Courthouse, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. Johnson's wife, Leslie Johnson, intends to plea guilty to charges next week. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson, arm and arm with his lawyer Billy Martin, leaves the U.S. Federal Courthouse, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. Johnson pleaded guilty to one count of extortion and one count of witness tampering. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

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The media surrounds former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson as he arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse in, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse in, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. At left is his lawyer Billy Martin. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse in, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. At left is his lawyer Billy Martin. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson, arm and arm with his lawyer Billy Martin, leaves the U.S. Federal Courthouse, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. Johnson pleaded guilty to one count of extortion and one count of witness tampering. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson heads to his car after leaving the U.S. Federal Courthouse, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. Johnson pleaded guilty to one count of extortion and one count of witness tampering. At right is his lawyer Billy Martin. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson speaks to the media outside the U.S. Federal Courthouse, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. Johnson pleaded guilty to one count of extortion and one count of witness tampering. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson speaks to the media outside the U.S. Federal Courthouse, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. Johnson pleaded guilty to one count of extortion and one count of witness tampering. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson, left, and lawyer Billy Martin, speak to the media outside the U.S. Federal Courthouse, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. Johnson pleaded guilty to one count of extortion and one count of witness tampering. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson heads to his car after leaving the U.S. Federal Courthouse, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. Johnson pleaded guilty to one count of extortion and one count of witness tampering. At right is his lawyer Billy Martin. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)

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Former Prince George's County Executive Jack B. Johnson arrives at the U.S. Federal Courthouse in, in Greenbelt, Md., Tuesday, May 17, 2011. At left is his lawyer Billy Martin. (Drew Angerer/The Washington Times)