Topic - James Cole

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  • Deputy Attorney General James Cole told the Senate intelligence committee that the administration is looking to end bulk data collection while allowing for enough flexibility to get large volumes of records if they are necessary to investigations. (Associated Press)

    NSA phone snooping end in sight

    The Obama administration vowed Thursday to end bulk collection of data if Congress passes a Patriot Act reform bill winding its way through the Senate, which is designed to end the NSA phone snooping program revealed by Edward Snowden.

  • ** FILE ** This Jan. 29, 2014, file photo shows Attorney General Eric Holder on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

    Justice Dept.'s new clemency guidelines: Crack offenders most obvious candidates

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  • FILE - In this May 7, 1953, file photo, Navajo miners work at the Kerr McGee uranium mine at Cove, Ariz., on the Navajo reservation in Arizona. Kerr-McGee left abandoned uranium mine sites, including contaminated waste rock piles, in the Lukachukai mountains of Arizona and in the Ambrosia Lake area of New Mexico. The Lukachukai mountains are located immediately west of Cove, Ariz., and are a culturally significant part of the Navajo Nation. This site is among thousands that are part of the $5.15 billion settlement with Anadarko Petroleum Corp. with approximate amount of funding for cleanup efforts and details about the sites, in information provided by the Justice Department.  (AP Photo)

    Feds reach $5.15B settlement over mining cleanup

    For decades, uranium ore was mined from the Lukachukai Mountains of northeastern Arizona, providing Navajos with much-needed employment but leaving behind a legacy of death and disease on the reservation.

  • FILE - In this May 7, 1953, file photo, Navajo miners work at the Kerr McGee uranium mine at Cove, Ariz., on the Navajo reservation in Arizona. Kerr-McGee left abandoned uranium mine sites, including contaminated waste rock piles, in the Lukachukai mountains of Arizona and in the Ambrosia Lake area of New Mexico. The Lukachukai mountains are located immediately west of Cove, Ariz., and are a culturally significant part of the Navajo Nation. This site is among thousands that are part of the $5.15 billion settlement with Anadarko Petroleum Corp. with approximate amount of funding for cleanup efforts and details about the sites, in information provided by the Justice Department.  (AP Photo)

    US reaches $5.15 billion environmental settlement

    The federal government on Thursday reached a $5.15 billion settlement with Anadarko Petroleum Corp., the largest ever for environmental contamination, to settle claims related to the cleanup of thousands of sites tainted with hazardous chemicals for decades.

  • Vice President Joe Biden and President Barack Obama look at an app on an iPhone in the Outer Oval Office, Saturday, July 16, 2011. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

    NSA snooping violates separation of powers, congressmen say

    Deputy Attorney General James Cole may have misled Congress earlier this month when he said the National Security Agency doesn't look at phone data it collects from members of Congress, three lawmakers wrote in a letter on Wednesday.

  • Deputy Attorney General James Cole testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014, before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Examining Recommendations to Reform FISA Authorities. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    Justice Dept. denies briefing Obama on IRS targeting

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  • Justice Department moving toward commuting long prison sentences for nonviolent drug offenders

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  • Deputy U.S. Attorney General James Cole:  "There are no perfect solutions here. We've reserved the right explicitly to go in and pre-empt at a later date if that becomes necessary." (associated press)

    New marijuana rules aren't a free-for-all, DOJ says

    Though the Justice Department is giving some leeway to states in controlling their own marijuana laws, the federal government won't let it turn into a free-for-all, Deputy Attorney General James Cole told Congress on Tuesday.

  • **FILE** Attorney General Eric Holder speaks June 11, 2012, at the League of Women Voters National Convention in Washington. (Associated Press)

    Holder emails: Get to the bottom of 'Fast and Furious'

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  • Cole

    Senate approves Cole as Holder's top Justice deputy

    Deputy Attorney General James Cole was confirmed on Tuesday by the Senate, mostly along party lines, as Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr.'s top deputy - a position he has held since Jan. 3 when he was installed by President Obama in a temporary recess appointment.

  • Cole

    Senate approves Cole as Holder's top deputy

    Deputy Attorney General James Cole was confirmed on Tuesday by the Senate, mostly along party lines, as Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr.'s top deputy — a position he has held since Jan. 3 when he was installed by President Obama in a temporary recess appointment.

  • **FILE** Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa, the top Judiciary Committee Republican (Associated Press)

    Senate Republicans block Justice Department nominee

    Senate Republicans blocked a nomination by President Obama for the first time this year on Monday, when they successfully filibustered the confirmation of the White House's pick for the No. 2 official at the Justice Department.

  • Sen. Charles E. Schumer, New York Democrat (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez)

    Democrats cite U.S. security in pushing Justice job nominee

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  • Assistant Attorney General Thomas E. Perez (left) announces results of a 10-month investigation that found New Orleans police officers engaged in unconstitutional conduct and violated federal laws. Also at the Thursday news conference were Mayor Mitch Landrieu (center) and Deputy Attorney General James Cole. (Associated Press)

    Report blasts New Orleans police actions

    New Orleans police officers have engaged in unconstitutional conduct and violated federal laws in their use of excessive force; illegal stops, searches and arrests; racial and ethnic profiling; and mistreatment of gays, according to a scathing Justice Department report released Thursday.

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Quotations
  • Mr. Cole said the law will still allow acquisition of a large amount of data, but won't allow it to be done indiscriminately.

    NSA phone snooping end in sight →

  • Asked what assurances there were that administration lawyers and the secret intelligence court wouldn't conspire to broaden those interpretations, Mr. Cole said lawmakers could rely on the legislative history they had established in saying they intended to end bulk collection.

    NSA phone snooping end in sight →

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