James Cole

Latest James Cole Items
  • Deputy Attorney General James Cole testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, July 17, 2014, before the House  Economic Growth, Job Creation, and Regulatory Affairs subcommittee hearing on how the Justice Department is investigating allegations that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) targeted conservative political groups for extra scrutiny.   (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Top Justice official denies conspiring with IRS on tea party targeting

    The Justice Department is looking into former IRS employee Lois G. Lerner's lost emails and why it took her agency so long to report the missing messages to Congress and other federal authorities, Deputy Attorney General James Cole told the House on Thursday.


  • Deputy Attorney General James Cole told the Senate intelligence committee that the administration is looking to end bulk data collection while allowing for enough flexibility to get large volumes of records if they are necessary to investigations. (Associated Press)

    NSA phone snooping end in sight

    The Obama administration vowed Thursday to end bulk collection of data if Congress passes a Patriot Act reform bill winding its way through the Senate, which is designed to end the NSA phone snooping program revealed by Edward Snowden.


  • ** FILE ** This Jan. 29, 2014, file photo shows Attorney General Eric Holder on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

    Justice Dept.'s new clemency guidelines: Crack offenders most obvious candidates

    Those serving jail-time on crack cocaine charges are the most obvious candidates to seek clemency or presidential pardon under six new guidelines released by the Justice Department on Wednesday. How many else may qualify because of the revised policy proposed by Attorney General Eric Holder and President Obama remains unclear, experts say.


  • FILE - In this May 7, 1953, file photo, Navajo miners work at the Kerr McGee uranium mine at Cove, Ariz., on the Navajo reservation in Arizona. Kerr-McGee left abandoned uranium mine sites, including contaminated waste rock piles, in the Lukachukai mountains of Arizona and in the Ambrosia Lake area of New Mexico. The Lukachukai mountains are located immediately west of Cove, Ariz., and are a culturally significant part of the Navajo Nation. This site is among thousands that are part of the $5.15 billion settlement with Anadarko Petroleum Corp. with approximate amount of funding for cleanup efforts and details about the sites, in information provided by the Justice Department.  (AP Photo)

    Feds reach $5.15B settlement over mining cleanup

    For decades, uranium ore was mined from the Lukachukai Mountains of northeastern Arizona, providing Navajos with much-needed employment but leaving behind a legacy of death and disease on the reservation.


  • FILE - In this May 7, 1953, file photo, Navajo miners work at the Kerr McGee uranium mine at Cove, Ariz., on the Navajo reservation in Arizona. Kerr-McGee left abandoned uranium mine sites, including contaminated waste rock piles, in the Lukachukai mountains of Arizona and in the Ambrosia Lake area of New Mexico. The Lukachukai mountains are located immediately west of Cove, Ariz., and are a culturally significant part of the Navajo Nation. This site is among thousands that are part of the $5.15 billion settlement with Anadarko Petroleum Corp. with approximate amount of funding for cleanup efforts and details about the sites, in information provided by the Justice Department.  (AP Photo)

    US reaches $5.15 billion environmental settlement

    The federal government on Thursday reached a $5.15 billion settlement with Anadarko Petroleum Corp., the largest ever for environmental contamination, to settle claims related to the cleanup of thousands of sites tainted with hazardous chemicals for decades.


  • ** FILE ** Vice President Joe Biden and President Barack Obama look at an app on an iPhone in the Outer Oval Office, Saturday, July 16, 2011. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

    NSA snooping violates separation of powers, congressmen say

    Deputy Attorney General James Cole may have misled Congress earlier this month when he said the National Security Agency doesn't look at phone data it collects from members of Congress, three lawmakers wrote in a letter on Wednesday.


  • House Judiciary Committee member Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio questions Deputy Attorney General James Cole on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014, during the committee's hearing on Examining Recommendations to Reform FISA Authorities. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    Justice Dept. denies briefing Obama on IRS targeting

    President Obama didn't check with the Justice Department before saying there was no corruption at the IRS, the department's deputy told Congress on Tuesday, ahead of several potential showdowns on Capitol Hill this week.


  • Justice Department moving toward commuting long prison sentences for nonviolent drug offenders

    The Obama administration is moving toward reducing the criminal penalties for nonviolent drug offenders serving long prison terms to help blunt the rising costs of federal imprisonment and tame the growing racial disparities within the prison population.


  • Justice Dept dramatically expanding clemency use

    The Justice Department on Thursday asked lawyers around the country to help some drug prisoners prepare petitions for clemency, a dramatic expansion of President Barack Obama's action last month commuting the sentences of eight people he said were serving unduly harsh drug sentences.


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