James G. Stavridis

Latest James G. Stavridis Items
  • Will Afghanistan security take backseat to Europe?

    With Russia pushing new hostilities to Europe's doorstep, U.S. and NATO officials are trying to gauge whether already dwindling resources and attention will be diverted from what, until now, has been a top security priority: Afghanistan.


  • Canadian soldiers (right), part of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), attend a graduation ceremony for Afghan soldiers at a military training center in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Wednesday, March 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq)

    NATO: Afghans to take lead in majority of country

    Afghan forces soon will start taking charge of security for three-quarters of the nation's 28 million people, NATO's top military commander said Wednesday.


  • Navy Adm. James G. Stavridis, NATO's top military commander, says the expectation of having more than 350,000 Afghan security force members in service by summer puts the turnover ahead of schedule. (Associated Press)

    NATO: Afghans to take lead in majority of country

    Afghan forces soon will start taking charge of security for three-quarters of the nation's 28 million people, NATO's top military commander said Wednesday, a milestone as the country assumes the lead for protecting the majority of its population.


  • A wounded rebel fighter rides in a pickup truck taking him to an ambulance that will carry him to a hospital on the outskirts of Ajdabiya, Libya. Britain and France want more NATO airstrikes against the Libyan regime. (Associated Press)

    British, French find resistance to more anti-Gadhafi airstrikes

    NATO remained deeply divided over the future of the military campaign in Libya after foreign ministers meeting in Berlin Thursday debated calls for increased airstrikes against Moammar Gadhafi.


  • A Libyan rebel waves a "magic box" bracelet thought to have been captured from a foreigner fighting with Col. Moammar Gadhafi's troops, on the frontline outside of Bin Jawaad on Tuesday. The wearers believe the bracelets will protect them from injury. (Associated Press)

    'Freelance jihadists' join Libyan rebels

    A former leader of Libya's al Qaeda affiliate says he thinks "freelance jihadists" have joined the rebel forces, as NATO's commander told Congress on Tuesday that intelligence indicates some al Qaeda and Hezbollah terrorists are fighting Col. Moammar Gadhafi's forces.


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