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John F. Kennedy

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FILE - In this Oct. 22, 1962, file photo, President John F. Kennedy makes a national television speech from Washington. Harvard University is honoring one of its most famous graduates, John F. Kennedy, with a symposium marking the 100th anniversary of the slain president’s birth. Harvard hosts the John F. Kennedy Centennial Symposium on Thursday, April 20, 2017. Kennedy was born May 29, 1917, in Brookline, Mass. (AP Photo/File)

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This undated photo released Thursday, March 23, 2017, by RR Auction shows a portion of a diary written in 1945 by young John F. Kennedy during his brief stint as a journalist after World War II. The diary will be offered for sale by the Boston-based auction firm during a live auction on April 26. Kennedy, later elected president in 1960, would have turned 100 on May 29, 2017. (Sarina Carlos/RR Auction via AP)

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John F. Kennedy (May 29, 1917 November 22, 1963) served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. The Cuban Missile Crisis, the Bay of Pigs Invasion, the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, the establishment of the Peace Corps, developments in the Space Race, the building of the Berlin Wall, the Trade Expansion Act to lower tariffs, and the Civil Rights Movement all took place during his presidency. Kennedy attempted to enter the Army's Officer Candidate School in 1940, but was medically disqualified for his chronic lower back problems. On September 24, 1941, after exercising for months to strengthen his back, and with the help of the director of the Office of Naval Intelligence, former naval attaché to Joseph Kennedy, he joined the United States Naval Reserve. In April 1943, he was assigned to Motor Torpedo Squadron TWO. On April 24, Kennedy took command of PT-109[ which was based at Tulagi Island in the Solomon Islands. On the night of August 12, PT-109, on its 31st mission, was performing nighttime patrols near New Georgia in the Solomon Islands with PT-162 and PT-169. Kennedy spotted a Japanese destroyer nearby and attempted to turn to attack, when PT-109 was rammed suddenly at an angle and cut in half by the destroyer Amagiri, costing two PT-109 crew members their lives. Kennedy gathered his surviving ten crew members including those injured around the wreckage, to vote on whether to "fight or surrender". Kennedy stated: "There's nothing in the book about a situation like this. A lot of you men have families and some of you have children. What do you want to do? I have nothing to lose." Shunning surrender, the men swam towards a small island three miles away. Despite re-injuring his back in the collision, Kennedy towed a badly burned crewman through the water to the island with a life jacket strap clenched between his teeth, and later to a second island, where his crew was subsequently rescued on August

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President John F. Kennedy holds an AR-15 in the Oval Office with military aide Gen. Chester Clifton. Kennedy, considered a founding father of the Green Berets, pushed the Army to give up the M14 for the new AR-15, which became the venerable M16.

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In this Oct. 22, 1962, file photo, President John F. Kennedy makes a national television speech from Washington. He announced a naval blockade of Cuba until Soviet missiles are removed. As the U.S. and Russia reached the brink of nuclear war in 1962, Kennedy received top-secret intelligence from the CIA that a new warhead launcher was spotted in Cuba. That report, given to Kennedy a day before the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis, is among roughly 19,000 pages of newly declassified CIA documents from the Cold War released Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015. (AP Photo/File) — FILE

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In this Oct. 22, 1962, photo, President John F. Kennedy makes a national television speech from Washington. He announced a naval blockade of Cuba until Soviet missiles are removed. As the U.S. and Russia reached the brink of nuclear war in 1962, Kennedy received top-secret intelligence from the CIA that a new warhead launcher was spotted in Cuba. That report, given to Kennedy a day before the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis, is among roughly 19,000 pages of newly declassified CIA documents from the Cold War released Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015. (AP Photo/File)

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In this Oct. 29, 1962, photo, President John F. Kennedy poses in the White House office with Gen. David Shoup, left, Marine Corps Commandant, and Adm. George Anderson, Chief of U.S. Naval Operations in Washington. The chiefs met with the president to review the situation in Cuba and operation of the U.S. naval blockade. As the U.S. and Russia reached the brink of nuclear war in 1962, Kennedy received top-secret intelligence from the CIA that a new warhead launcher was spotted in Cuba. That report, given to Kennedy a day before the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis, is among roughly 19,000 pages of newly declassified CIA documents from the Cold War released Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015. (AP Photo/William J. Smith, File)

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John F. Kennedy's historic M1 Garand rifle goes up for auction -- and bids could reach $100,000 (image from the Rock Island Auction Company)

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A Twitter user by the name @BrooklynJuggler trolled California Rep. Darrell Issa into retweeting a photo of his dear "Uncle Lee," which was really a photo of Lee Harvey Oswald, the former Marine believed to have assassinated President John F. Kennedy. (Twitter/@BrooklynJuggler)

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Sen. John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Kennedy relax aboard the family yacht, Marlin, before sailing around Nantucket sound at Hyannis Port, Ma., on July 19, 1960. (AP Photo)

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President John F. Kennedy "clearly enunciated America’s highest value," writes Deane Waldman, when he committed the nation to assuring “the survival and the success of liberty” in his famous inaugural speech. (AP Photo, File)

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** FILE ** This Jan. 11, 1962, file photo shows President John F. Kennedy giving his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo, File)

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Lauren Bush Lauren, right, granddaughter of Former President George H.W. Bush, stands with Jack Schlossberg, center and Rose Schlossberg, left, grandchildren of President John F. Kennedy, after accepting the 2014 John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award on behalf of her grandfather during a ceremony at the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum, Sunday, May 4, 2014, in Boston. (AP Photo/Gretchen Ertl)