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  • ** FILE ** Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales participates in an exercise at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    Bales defers plea in Afghan massacre

    The U.S. soldier accused of carrying out the massacre of 16 Afghan civilians during nighttime raids on two villages last year deferred entering a plea Thursday to charges that could bring the death penalty.

  • ** FILE ** Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales participates in an exercise at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    U.S. Army seeks death penalty in Afghan massacre case

    The U.S. Army said Wednesday it will seek the death penalty against the soldier accused of killing 16 Afghan villagers in a predawn rampage in March.

  • ** FILE ** Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales participates in an exercise at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    Hearing to begin Monday for suspect in Afghanistan massacre

    The U.S. soldier accused of carrying out one of the worst atrocities of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars is due to appear in a military courtroom Monday, where prosecutors will lay out for the first time their case that he slaughtered 16 people, including children, during a predawn raid on two villages in the Taliban's heartland.

  • Lawyer: Suspect in Afghan slayings had 'depression' after Iraq

    The U.S. soldier accused of killing 17 Afghan civilians suffered a traumatic incident during his second tour in Iraq that triggered "tremendous depression," his lawyer said Wednesday.

  • ** FILE ** Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales participates in an exercise at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    Wife defends soldier accused in Afghan rampage

    he wife of a U.S. soldier accused of killing 17 Afghan civilians says her husband showed no signs of PTSD before he deployed, and she doesn't feel as if she'll ever believe he was involved in the killings.

  • **FILE** In this photo provided by the Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Sgt. Robert Bales takes part in exercises at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Aug. 23, 2011. (Associated Press/DVIDS, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    U.S. soldier charged in Afghan shooting rampage

    U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales was charged on Friday with 17 counts of premeditated murder, a capital offense that could lead to the death penalty in the massacre of Afghan civilians, the U.S. military said.

  • Bales (Associated Press)

    Bales faces 17 counts of murder in Afghan killings

    The U.S. military intends to tell Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales Friday he faces 17 counts of murder and six counts of attempted murder, along with other charges, in connection with a shooting rampage in two southern Afghanistan villages that shocked Americans back home and further roiled U.S.-Afghan relations.

  • In this Dec. 16, 2011, photo, John Henry Browne, right, the attorney for Colton Harris-Moore, left, who is also known as the "Barefoot Bandit," listens to testimony in Island County Superior Court, in Coupeville, Wash. Browne is now representing Robert Bales, who is accused of killing 16 civilians in Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    Soldier's lawyer known for 'humanizing' clients

    A day before the public learned the name of the soldier accused of methodically slaughtering 16 civilians in Afghanistan, his lawyer called a news conference and sketched a different portrait of Robert Bales: that of a loving father and devoted husband who had been traumatized by a comrade's injury and sent into combat one too many times.

  • Troops in Afghanistan have few opportunities to rest, according to an Army report that provides a stark look at post-traumatic stress disorder and its risk of irrational acts. Fighting forces have endured frequent stressful deployments and compressed time back home. (Associated Press)

    Troops stressed to breaking point

    A recent Army health report draws an alarming profile of a fighting force more prone to inexcusable violence amid an "epidemic" of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the mental breakdown attracting speculation as a factor in a massacre of Afghan civilians this month.

  • ** FILE ** Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales participates in an exercise at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif., on Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011. (AP Photo/Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System, Spc. Ryan Hallock)

    Lawyer: Afghan killings suspect recalls little

    Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales remembers little about the night he is accused of slaughtering 16 Afghan civilians in a nighttime shooting rampage, his lawyer says.

  • Afghan villagers pray during a ceremony on Tuesday, March 13, 2012, for the victims of Sunday's killing of 16 civilians allegedly by a U.S. soldier in Panjwai, Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Allauddin Khan)

    Suspect in killing of Afghan civilians identified

    After five days cloaked in military secrecy, the soldier suspected in a massacre of 16 Afghan civilians has finally been identified, adding a critical detail to the still-sketchy portrait just beginning to emerge. A senior U.S. official says the soldier accused in the killings is Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales.

  • FILE - In this Sunday, March 11, 2012 file photo, U.S. Army and Afghan soldiers are seen in a guard tower at their base in Panjwai, Kandahar province south of Kabul, Afghanistan, following the alleged killing of 16 civilians by a U.S. soldier. U.S. investigators have determined that the suspect had been drinking alcohol prior to leaving the base the night of the attack, a senior U.S. defense official said Friday. How much of a role alcohol played in the attack is still under investigation, said the official, speaking on condition of anonymity because charges have not yet been filed. (AP Photo/Allauddin Khan, File)

    Experts: Soldier might have post-traumatic stress

    They are questions already being debated: Did the soldier suspected of killing Afghan villagers have post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD? And did the people who sent him back to war after he was injured properly determine he was mentally fit to return?

  • John Henry Browne, the attorney representing the U.S. soldier who is accused of killing 16 Afghan civilians, talks to reporters, Thursday, Mar. 15, 2012, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    Official: Afghanistan slaying suspect headed to U.S.

    The soldier accused of killing 16 Afghan villagers was on his way to a U.S. military prison, a senior defense official said Friday, as the soldier's attorney spoke of the impact the fighting had on his client.

  • U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan, right, talks to reporters, Friday, June 17, 2011, in Seattle, as San Juan County prosecutor Randall Gaylord looks on at left, after Colton Harris-Moore, known as the "Barefoot Bandit," pleaded guilty to seven charges stemming from a multi-state crime spree that included the thefts of several airplanes and boats. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    After 2-year run, 'Barefoot Bandit' faces prison

    Colton Harris-Moore gained authority-mocking, cult status as he ran from the law for two years in stolen boats, cars and planes. Now, he faces years in prison.

  • Colton Harris-Moore, seen here in July 2010, exits a plane handcuffed and escorted by police upon arrival in Nassau, Bahamas. He was subsequently extradited back to the U.S. for trial. On Thursday, he pleaded not guilty to a series of crimes. (Associated Press)

    'Barefoot Bandit' suspect pleads not guilty in Seattle

    The 20-year-old who gained a popular following as the "Barefoot Bandit" pleaded not guilty to all charges Thursday in federal court in Seattle.

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