Topic - Juliet Nicolson

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  • BOOK REVIEW: 'The Great Silence'

    Although the guns stopped at precisely the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, the carnage of the previous years continued to resonate through a relieved but partially numbed world. The charnel house couldn't morph directly into the Jazz Age, and Juliet Nicolson's "The Great Silence" explores the liminal period between them.

  • On the edge of an abyss

    One of the benefits of narrative nonfiction writing is that the writer and the reader both have the chance to revisit a broader historical epoch in slices. One can look for insights in a specific turning point in time or in a group of seemingly minor characters whose important roles have been obscured by better known players

  • On the edge of an abyss

    One of the benefits of narrative nonfiction writing is that the writer and the reader both have the chance to revisit a broader historical epoch in slices. One can look for insights in a specific turning point in time or in a group of seemingly minor characters whose important roles have been obscured by better known players

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Quotations
  • She aptly quotes the remembrance of a countess of that summer, "We danced on the edge of an abyss."

    On the edge of an abyss →

  • What Ms. Nicolson doesn't bother to disclose is that this "ebullient society hostess" is in fact her own great-grandmother, although she is careful to mention "Lady Sackville's daughter, Vita Sackville-West" - perhaps to point cognoscenti toward the connection.

    BOOK REVIEW: 'The Great Silence' →

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