Topic - Kadima

Kadima (, lit. Forward) was founded as a centrist political party in Israel by moderates from Likud soon joined by like-minded Labor politicians. It became the largest party in the Knesset after the 2006 elections, winning 29 of the 120 seats. Kadima was originally founded largely to support the issue of Ariel Sharon's unilateral disengagement plan, and classified itself broadly as centrist and liberal. The party is currently headed by Tzipi Livni, who places strong emphasis on both Israel's security and continuing the peace process, and its members include moderates of the political center who support diplomatic steps to peace with the Palestinians. - Source: Wikipedia

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