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Konstantin Novoselov

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APTOPIX_Britain_Nobel_Physics.sff.jpg

Professor Andre Geim, left, and Dr Konstantin Novoselov who have have been awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics are seen outside Manchester University, Manchester, England, Tuesday, Oct, 5, 2010. The scientists shared the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for "groundbreaking experiments" with the thinnest, strongest material known to mankind a carbon vital for the creation of faster computers and transparent touch screens. (AP Photo/Jon Super).

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CORRECTION_Britain_Nobel_Physics.sff.jpg

Professor Andre Geim, left, and Dr Konstantin Novoselov who have have been awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics are seen outside Manchester University, Manchester, England, Tuesday, Oct, 5, 2010. The scientists shared the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for "groundbreaking experiments" with the thinnest, strongest material known to mankind a carbon vital for the creation of faster computers and transparent touch screens. (AP Photo/Jon Super).

Britain_Nobel_Physics.sff.jpg

Britain_Nobel_Physics.sff.jpg

Professor Andre Geim, right, is congratulated by a wellwisher outside Manchester University after being awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics along with colleague Dr Konstantin Novoselov, Manchester, England, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010. The scientists shared the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for "groundbreaking experiments" with the thinnest, strongest material known to mankind a carbon vital for the creation of faster computers and transparent touch screens. (AP Photo/Jon Super).

Nobel_Physics.sff.jpg

Nobel_Physics.sff.jpg

Members of the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences, from left, Ingemar Lundstrom, Staffan Normark, Borje Johansson and Per Delsing, announce that Russian-born scientists Andre Geim, left on screen, and Konstantin Novoselov, right on screen behind podium, share the Nobel Prize in physics for "groundbreaking experiments" with an atom-thin material expected to play a large role in electronics in Stockholm, Sweden Tuesday Oct. 5, 2010 (AP Photo/Scanpix Sweden/Maja Suslin)

Nobel-Physics.sff.jpg

Nobel-Physics.sff.jpg

University of Manchester professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, right, awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics pose for pictures outside Manchester University, Manchester, England, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010. Two Russian-born scientists shared the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for "groundbreaking experiments" with the thinnest, strongest material known to mankind _ a carbon vital for the creation of faster computers and transparent touch screens. (AP Photo/Jon Super).

Nobel-Physics_Thir-1.jpg

Nobel-Physics_Thir-1.jpg

University of Manchester professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, right, awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics pose for pictures outside Manchester University, Manchester, England, Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2010. (AP Photo/Jon Super).

Nobel Physics_Thir.jpg

Nobel Physics_Thir.jpg

Members of the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences, left below screen, announce that Russian-born scientists Andre Geim, left on screen, and Konstantin Novoselov, right on screen behind podium, share the Nobel Prize in physics for "groundbreaking experiments" with an atom-thin material expected to play a large role in electronics in Stockholm, Sweden Tuesday Oct. 5, 2010 (AP Photo/Scanpix Sweden/Maja Suslin)