Kyrgyzstan

Latest Kyrgyzstan Items
  • Ethnic Kyrgyz refugees and election commission officials pray after voting on a new constitution in Kyrgyzstan on Sunday. (Associated Press)

    Kyrgyz leaders say constitution OK'd

    Barely two weeks after ethnic purges left many minority Uzbek communities in smoldering ruin, about two-thirds of Kyrgyzstan's voters went to the polls Sunday to peacefully and overwhelmingly approve a new constitution they hoped would bring stability to the Central Asian nation.


  • Kyrgyz soldiers conduct a foot patrol in Suratash, Kyrgyzstan. Soldiers tried to reassure refugees it was safe to return home, but many refused to go. (Associated Press)

    Ethnic Uzbeks refuse to return to Kyrgyzstan

    Thousands of ethnic Uzbeks massed on the border between Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan refused to return home Sunday, saying they feared for their lives after violent pogroms and didn't trust Kyrgyz troops to protect them.


  • Kyrgyzstan's interim government leader Roza Otunbayeva, right, speaks to a wounded ethnic Kyrgyz citizen in the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh, Kyrgyzstan, Friday, June 18, 2010. She is vowing to work for the return of refugees who fled deadly ethnic violence there by the hundreds of thousands. (AP Photo/Kyrgyz Presidential Press Service, Sagyn Alchiyev, pool)

    Ethnic Uzbeks in squalid camps fear returning home

    Ethnic Uzbeks sheltering in squalid tent camps say they don't have enough food or clean water but are terrified of going back to live alongside those they hold responsible for days of shootings, arson and sexual assaults.


  • Ethnic Uzbeks and Kyrgyz jointly dismantle a street barricade on the border of Uzbek district in the southern city of Osh, Saturday, June 19, 2010. Some 4,500 refugees have returned to Kyrgyzstan from neighboring Uzbekistan in the past few days, the Kyrgyz Border Service said in its press release on Saturday, according to reports by Itar-Tass. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

    U.S. envoy urges action on Kyrgyz riots

    A top U.S. envoy called Saturday for an independent investigation into the violence that has devastated southern Kyrgyzstan, as amateur video emerged of unarmed Uzbeks gathering to defend their town during the attacks.


  • Kyrgyzstan's interim government leader Rosa Otunbayeva wearing a flak jacket, reacts as she listens to a question during her meeting with local officials after landing by military helicopter on the central square in the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh, Kyrgyzstan, Friday, June 18, 2010. She is vowing to work for the return of refugees who fled deadly ethnic violence there by the hundreds of thousands. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

    Kyrgyz leader says 2,000 dead in clashes

    Kyrgyzstan's interim president said Friday that 2,000 people may have died in the ethnic clashes that have rocked the country's south — many times her government's official estimate — as she made her first visit to a riot-hit city since the unrest erupted.


  • Ethnic Uzbek men push a truck as they build a barricade in the Uzbek district in the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh on Thursday, June 17, 2010. Some 400,000 people have been displaced by ethnic violence in southern Kyrgyzstan, the United Nations announced Thursday, dramatically increasing the official estimate of a refugee crisis that has left throngs of desperate, fearful people without enough food and water in grim camps along the Kyrgyz-Uzbek border. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

    U.N.: 400,000 now uprooted by Kyrgyzstan unrest

    Some 400,000 people have been displaced by ethnic violence in southern Kyrgyzstan, the United Nations announced Thursday, dramatically increasing the official estimate of a crisis that has left throngs of desperate, fearful refugees without enough food and water in grim camps along the Uzbek border.


  • A Kyrgyz soldier searches a passenger for weapons at a checkpoint on the Uzbek border side on the outskirts of the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh in Kyrgyzstan on Wednesday. Heavy arms fire rang out over Osh before dawn. (Associated Press)

    Kyrgyzstan military seeks control in Osh

    Kyrgyzstan's weak military attempted Wednesday to regain control of the city of Osh, a major transit point for Afghan heroin and the epicenter of ethnic violence that has driven much of the Uzbek population from the country's poor, rural south.


  • Kyrgyz soldiers and volunteers check passing cars and search passengers for weapons at a check point on the Uzbek border side on the outskirts of the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh in Kyrgyzstan Wednesday, June 16, 2010. Heavy arms fire rang out over the Kyrgyz city of Osh before dawn Wednesday as authorities struggled to bring order to the country's south, which has been thrust into chaos by days of deadly ethnic riots. The violence has prompted more than 100,000 Uzbeks to flee for their lives to Uzbekistan, with tens of thousands more camped on the Kyrgyz side or stranded in a no man's land. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

    Kyrgyz army tries to get control in riot-hit south

    Kyrgyzstan's weak military attempted Wednesday to regain control of the city of Osh, a major transit point for Afghan heroin and the epicenter of ethnic violence that has driven much of the Uzbek population from the country's poor, rural south.


  • Associated Press
Uzbeks mourn a victim of rioting between Kyrgyz and ethnic Uzbeks. Violence has left Kyrgyzstan's second-largest city, Osh, in smoldering ruins and sent more than 100,000 Uzbeks fleeing for their lives.

    Kyrgyz riots leave hundreds dead

    Rioting has killed several hundred people in the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan, the International Committee of the Red Cross said Tuesday, as new reports bolstered suspicions that the ethnic violence was deliberately ignited to undermine the interim government.


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