Kyrgyzstan

Latest Kyrgyzstan Items
  • Ethnic Uzbeks and Kyrgyz jointly dismantle a street barricade on the border of Uzbek district in the southern city of Osh, Saturday, June 19, 2010. Some 4,500 refugees have returned to Kyrgyzstan from neighboring Uzbekistan in the past few days, the Kyrgyz Border Service said in its press release on Saturday, according to reports by Itar-Tass. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

    U.S. envoy urges action on Kyrgyz riots

    A top U.S. envoy called Saturday for an independent investigation into the violence that has devastated southern Kyrgyzstan, as amateur video emerged of unarmed Uzbeks gathering to defend their town during the attacks.


  • Kyrgyzstan's interim government leader Rosa Otunbayeva wearing a flak jacket, reacts as she listens to a question during her meeting with local officials after landing by military helicopter on the central square in the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh, Kyrgyzstan, Friday, June 18, 2010. She is vowing to work for the return of refugees who fled deadly ethnic violence there by the hundreds of thousands. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

    Kyrgyz leader says 2,000 dead in clashes

    Kyrgyzstan's interim president said Friday that 2,000 people may have died in the ethnic clashes that have rocked the country's south — many times her government's official estimate — as she made her first visit to a riot-hit city since the unrest erupted.


  • Ethnic Uzbek men push a truck as they build a barricade in the Uzbek district in the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh on Thursday, June 17, 2010. Some 400,000 people have been displaced by ethnic violence in southern Kyrgyzstan, the United Nations announced Thursday, dramatically increasing the official estimate of a refugee crisis that has left throngs of desperate, fearful people without enough food and water in grim camps along the Kyrgyz-Uzbek border. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

    U.N.: 400,000 now uprooted by Kyrgyzstan unrest

    Some 400,000 people have been displaced by ethnic violence in southern Kyrgyzstan, the United Nations announced Thursday, dramatically increasing the official estimate of a crisis that has left throngs of desperate, fearful refugees without enough food and water in grim camps along the Uzbek border.


  • A Kyrgyz soldier searches a passenger for weapons at a checkpoint on the Uzbek border side on the outskirts of the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh in Kyrgyzstan on Wednesday. Heavy arms fire rang out over Osh before dawn. (Associated Press)

    Kyrgyzstan military seeks control in Osh

    Kyrgyzstan's weak military attempted Wednesday to regain control of the city of Osh, a major transit point for Afghan heroin and the epicenter of ethnic violence that has driven much of the Uzbek population from the country's poor, rural south.


  • Kyrgyz soldiers and volunteers check passing cars and search passengers for weapons at a check point on the Uzbek border side on the outskirts of the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh in Kyrgyzstan Wednesday, June 16, 2010. Heavy arms fire rang out over the Kyrgyz city of Osh before dawn Wednesday as authorities struggled to bring order to the country's south, which has been thrust into chaos by days of deadly ethnic riots. The violence has prompted more than 100,000 Uzbeks to flee for their lives to Uzbekistan, with tens of thousands more camped on the Kyrgyz side or stranded in a no man's land. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

    Kyrgyz army tries to get control in riot-hit south

    Kyrgyzstan's weak military attempted Wednesday to regain control of the city of Osh, a major transit point for Afghan heroin and the epicenter of ethnic violence that has driven much of the Uzbek population from the country's poor, rural south.


  • Associated Press
Uzbeks mourn a victim of rioting between Kyrgyz and ethnic Uzbeks. Violence has left Kyrgyzstan's second-largest city, Osh, in smoldering ruins and sent more than 100,000 Uzbeks fleeing for their lives.

    Kyrgyz riots leave hundreds dead

    Rioting has killed several hundred people in the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan, the International Committee of the Red Cross said Tuesday, as new reports bolstered suspicions that the ethnic violence was deliberately ignited to undermine the interim government.


  • A Uzbek woman who fled the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh cries as she waits for permission to cross the Kyrgyz-Uzbek border into Uzbekistan on Tuesday, June 15, 2010. Uzbekistan closed the border Tuesday, leaving many camped out on the Kyrgyz side or stranded behind barbed-wire fences in no man's land. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

    Red Cross: 'Several hundred' dead in Kyrgyz unrest

    Rioting has killed at least several hundred people in the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan, the Red Cross said Tuesday, as new reports strengthened suspicions that the violence was deliberately ignited to undermine the interim government.


  • An Uzbek woman who fled from the southern Kyrgyz city of Osh after her husband was killed and house burned down stands in line in no-man's-land near the Uzbek village of Jalal-Kuduk waiting for permission to cross into Uzbekistan, Monday, June 14, 2010. Tens of thousands of refugees fled pogroms that began last week in southern Kyrgyzstan. (AP Photo/Anvar Ilyasov)

    100,000 Uzbeks flee riots in Kyrgyzstan

    Some 100,000 minority Uzbeks fleeing a purge by mobs of Kyrgyz massed at the border Monday, an Uzbek leader said, as the deadliest ethnic violence to hit this Central Asian nation in decades left entire blocks of a major city burned to the ground.


  • Kyrgyzstan's deposed President Kurmanbek Bakiyev smiles as he speaks Tuesday during a press conference in the courtyard of his family home in the village of Teyit, in the Jalal-Abad region of southern Kyrgyzstan. Mr. Bakiyev said Tuesday he is willing to resign if his security is guaranteed. (Associated Press)

    Kyrgyz president offers to leave

    Kyrgyzstan's deposed president said Tuesday he will resign if the interim authorities guarantee his security, and the head of the security services said he was ready to make such a promise.


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