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FILE - In this Dec. 13, 2011 file photo, former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky arrives with his wife, Dottie Sandusky, for a preliminary hearing at the Centre County Courthouse in Bellefonte, Pa. Dottie Sandusky says it was long after he’d been arrested, tried and convicted before she realized just how much trouble the former Penn State assistant football coach had gotten himself into. In an interview this week at her home in State College, Dottie Sandusky said that even after his 45-count guilty verdict in the child molestation case, she still had had hope. But when the judge gave him to 30 to 60 years in state prison, she said, she fully comprehended the trouble he was in. She’s been granting interviews in recent weeks, arguing her husband’s conviction was unjust and claiming the victims who testified against him told inaccurate stories to cash in. An attorney involved in negotiating with Penn State on behalf of his victims calls her denials “obscene.” (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

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**FILE** The current U.S. Supreme Court comprises (clockwise from upper left) Associate Justices Samuel A. Alito Jr., Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen G. Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, Clarence Thomas and Antonin Scalia; Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.; and Associate Justices John Paul Stevens and Anthony M. Kennedy. (The Washington Times)

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FILE - In this Dec. 13, 2011 file photo, former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky arrives with his wife, Dottie Sandusky, for a preliminary hearing at the Centre County Courthouse in Bellefonte, Pa. Dottie Sandusky says it was long after he’d been arrested, tried and convicted before she realized just how much trouble the former Penn State assistant football coach had gotten himself into. In an interview this week at her home in State College, Dottie Sandusky said that even after his 45-count guilty verdict in the child molestation case, she still had had hope. But when the judge gave him to 30 to 60 years in state prison, she said, she fully comprehended the trouble he was in. She’s been granting interviews in recent weeks, arguing her husband’s conviction was unjust and claiming the victims who testified against him told inaccurate stories to cash in. An attorney involved in negotiating with Penn State on behalf of his victims calls her denials “obscene.” (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2012 file photo, Dottie Sandusky, the wife of former Penn State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky arrives for the sentencing of her husband at the Centre County Courthouse in Bellefonte, Pa. Dottie Sandusky says it was long after he’d been arrested, tried and convicted before she realized just how much trouble the former Penn State assistant football coach had gotten himself into. In an interview this week at her home in State College, Dottie Sandusky said that even after his 45-count guilty verdict in the child molestation case, she still had had hope. But when the judge gave him to 30 to 60 years in state prison, she said, she fully comprehended the trouble he was in. She’s been granting interviews in recent weeks, arguing her husband’s conviction was unjust and claiming the victims who testified against him told inaccurate stories to cash in. An attorney involved in negotiating with Penn State on behalf of his victims calls her denials “obscene.” (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

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In this Dec. 6, 2007 photo, the Rev. Kevin Kisler, of the Covenant Orthodox Presbyterian Church of Greece, ends his moment of prayer at the start of a 2008 Greece Town Board meeting in Greece, N.Y. In the spring of 2014, the United States Supreme Court is expected to rule on whether the town’s practice of opening board meetings with predominantly Christian-themed prayers violates the U.S. Constitution. Two township residents brought suit after complaining that the practice made them uncomfortable. Seated in the rear are from left, are, from left, Robert Bilsky, John Auberger and Jerry Helfer. (AP Photo/Democrat & Chronicle, Shawn Dowd)

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In this Jan. 30, 2013 photo, Linda Stephens poses for a photo in her Greece, N.Y., home. Stephens, an atheist, is one of two town residents who brought suit against Greece, N.Y., after complaining that the Christian prayers that town board meetings were opened with made them uncomfortable. In the spring of 2014, the United States Supreme Court is expected to rule whether the township violated the Constitution by opening town board meetings regularly using Christian Prayers. (AP Photo/Democrat and Chronicle, Jamie Germano)