Law_Crime - Bio, News, Photos - Washington Times
Skip to content

Law_Crime

Latest Stories

7ea727c479b88010520f6a7067006a52.jpg

7ea727c479b88010520f6a7067006a52.jpg

Inmates ride a horse in the Buddy Pick-Up event at the Angola Prison Rodeo in Angola, La., Saturday, April 26, 2014. Louisiana's most violent criminals, many serving life sentences for murder, are the stars of the nation's longest-running prison rodeo. In a half-century, the event has grown from a small event for prisoners into a big business that draws thousands of spectators. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

e6cb7aa758817510520f6a7067006389.jpg

e6cb7aa758817510520f6a7067006389.jpg

In this April 22, 2014 photo, Fane Lozman pulls his dock away from his home floating in the waters near North Bay Village, Fla., as he returns to the shoreline. Lozman caught legal lightning in a bottle last year when the U.S. Supreme Court agreed with him that his floating home was a house, not a vessel covered by maritime law. But the justices haven’t had the last word: Lozman is still fighting for compensation for the home, which was destroyed years ago. The Fort Lauderdale-based federal judge whose decision on the floating home was overturned, U.S. District Judge William Dimitrouleas, refused earlier this year to give Lozman any of the $25,000 bond posted by the city of Riviera Beach to pay for Lozman’s home in case he won. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

5dff991558817510520f6a7067007a40.jpg

5dff991558817510520f6a7067007a40.jpg

In this April 22, 2014 photo, Fane Lozman poses for photos holding his dog on his home floating in the waters near North Bay Village, Fla. Lozman caught legal lightning in a bottle last year when the U.S. Supreme Court agreed with him that his floating home was a house, not a vessel covered by maritime law. But the justices haven’t had the last word: Lozman is still fighting for compensation for the home, which was destroyed years ago. The Fort Lauderdale-based federal judge whose decision on the floating home was overturned, U.S. District Judge William Dimitrouleas, refused earlier this year to give Lozman any of the $25,000 bond posted by the city of Riviera Beach to pay for Lozman’s home in case he won. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

d3ff8c5558807510520f6a706700dc5d.jpg

d3ff8c5558807510520f6a706700dc5d.jpg

In this April 22, 2014 photo, Fane Lozman poses for photos holding his dog and in front of his home floating in the waters near North Bay Village, Fla. He caught legal lightning in a bottle last year when the U.S. Supreme Court agreed with him that his floating home was a house, not a vessel covered by maritime law. But the justices haven’t had the last word: Lozman is still fighting for compensation for the home, which was destroyed years ago. The Fort Lauderdale-based federal judge whose decision on the floating home was overturned, U.S. District Judge William Dimitrouleas, refused earlier this year to give Lozman any of the $25,000 bond posted by the city of Riviera Beach to pay for Lozman’s home in case he won. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter)

a196d79058dd7610520f6a706700242f.jpg

a196d79058dd7610520f6a706700242f.jpg

FILE - This May 3, 2013, photo provided by Jeremy Jones shows authorities with Buford Rogers, right, who belongs to a tiny local militia, during a raid on a mobile home in Montevideo, Minn. Rogers, 25, is scheduled to be sentenced Monday, April 28, 2011 after pleading guilty to one count of possessing a firearm illegally and one count of possessing an unregistered destructive device, namely "two black powder and nail devices," which he admitted he made himself. Prosecutors are seeking more than five years in prison, arguing that Rogers poses a threat to public safety, noting the items were designed solely to injure people. (AP Photo/Montevideo American-News, Jeremy Jones, File) MANDATORY CREDIT

65f79aad58dd7610520f6a706700c048.jpg

65f79aad58dd7610520f6a706700c048.jpg

FILE - This file photo provided by the Chippewa County, Minn., Sheriff shows Buford Rogers who was arrested Friday, May 3, 2013, during a raid on a mobile home in Montevideo, Minn. Rogers, 25, is scheduled to be sentenced Monday, April 28, 2014 after pleading guilty to one count of possessing a firearm illegally and one count of possessing an unregistered destructive device, namely "two black powder and nail devices," which he admitted he made himself. Prosecutors are seeking more than five years in prison, arguing that Rogers poses a threat to public safety, noting the items were designed solely to injure people. (AP Photo/Montevideo American-News, Jeremy Jones) MANDATORY CREDIT