Lyndon B. Johnson

Latest Lyndon B. Johnson Items
  • President Barack Obama speaks at the LBJ Presidential Library, Thursday, April 10, 2014, in Austin, Texas, during the Civil Rights Summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama lauds LBJ on 50th anniversary of Civil Rights Act

    On the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, President Obama praised former President Lyndon Johnson Thursday for pushing through the landmark legislation and said his own presidency wouldn't be possible without it.


  • For Obama, frustration in comparisons to LBJ

    Perhaps no historical analogy irks the White House more than the comparisons between Presidents Barack Obama and Lyndon B. Johnson, two Democrats who occupied the Oval Office a half-century apart.


  • Obama will speak at UC Irvine graduation ceremony

    President Barack Obama will speak at the University of California, Irvine, commencement in June after students and staff delivered thousands of postcards requesting him, officials said Thursday.


  • This image released by Jeffrey Richards Associates shows Bryan Cranston portraying President Lyndon B. Johnson during a performance of "All the Way." Cranston plays Johnson during his first year in office following the assassination of John F. Kennedy and explores both his fight for re-election and the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Richards Associates, Evgenia Eliseeva)

    Review: Bryan Cranston superb in 'All the Way'

    The new Broadway play "All the Way," about President Lyndon B. Johnson's first bumpy term in office, may seem like a serious, dusty affair suitable for high school field trips. Don't be fooled: Leave the little ones at home or risk having some kids come home with foul stories.


  • This image released by Jeffrey Richards Associates shows Bryan Cranston portraying President Lyndon B. Johnson during a performance of "All the Way." Cranston plays Johnson during his first year in office following the assassination of John F. Kennedy and explores both his fight for re-election and the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Richards Associates, Evgenia Eliseeva)

    Bryan Cranston plays another 'complicated man'

    Bryan Cranston doesn't need to chase paychecks anymore. His salary for "Breaking Bad" wasn't exactly at drug kingpin levels, but he's secure.


  • Austin's LBJ library hosts civil rights summit

    The LBJ Presidential Library announced Monday it's hosting a major civil rights summit featuring at least two former presidents and marking the 50th anniversary of Lyndon B. Johnson signing the Civil Rights Act.


  • LBJ Foundation, US vie for historic Boeing 707

    A battle is brewing over who gets to display the Air Force One jet aboard which President Lyndon B. Johnson took the oath of office.


  • President Obama hails a Senate vote advancing a bill to renew benefits for the long-term jobless. While the president rails against income inequality in America, his policies have had little overall effect against poverty. Story, A3. (Associated Press)

    DiBACCO: After 50 years of failure, have we learned nothing?

    Fifty years ago on Wednesday, President Lyndon B. Johnson, in his State of the Union address before Congress, announced that "this administration, here and now, declares unconditional war on poverty in America."


  • Illustration by Greg Groesch

    EDITORIAL: The art of stealing elections

    Stealing elections is an old game politicians play. Lyndon B. Johnson, the 36th president, got to the U.S. Senate in 1948 by "winning" the closest race in Texas history by a margin of 87 votes out of more than a million cast. An election judge in tiny Alice, Texas, said he counted more than 200 names on the voting roll for Box 13 that were written in alphabetic succession in the same hand, same color of ink. When a federal court subpoenaed Box 13, it was discovered to be "lost." LBJ took his seat in the Senate. Voting machines were supposed to put an end to such election-night chicanery, but Earl Long, the colorful governor of Louisiana, where fraud is the national sport, boasted that "I can make a voting machine play 'Home on the Range' all night long."


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