Topic - Maine Supreme Judicial Court

The Maine Supreme Judicial Court is the highest court in the state of Maine's judicial system. Known as the Law Court when sitting as an appellate court, it is composed of seven justices, who are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Maine Senate. Justices serve for seven-year terms, with no limit on the number of terms that they may serve. - Source: Wikipedia

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  • FILE - In this June 12, 2013 file photo, transgender student Nicole Maines, center, with her father Wayne Maines, left, and brother Jonas, speaks to reporters outside the Penobscot Judicial Center in Bangor, Maine. The Maine Supreme Judicial Court ruled Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, that Nicole Maines should have been allowed to use the bathroom of her choice in 2009 after school officials required her to use a staff bathroom instead of the girls' restroom. The high court concluded that the Orono school district's actions violated the Maine Human Rights Act, a state law that bans discrimination based on sexual orientation. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)

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  • FILE - In this June 12, 2013 file photo, transgender student Nicole Maines, center, with her father Wayne Maines, left, and brother Jonas, speaks to reporters outside the Penobscot Judicial Center in Bangor, Maine. The Maine Supreme Judicial Court ruled Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, that Nicole Maines should have been allowed to use the bathroom of her choice in 2009 after school officials required her to use a staff bathroom instead of the girls' restroom. The high court concluded that the Orono school district's actions violated the Maine Human Rights Act, a state law that bans discrimination based on sexual orientation. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)

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  • FILE - In this June 12, 2013 file photo, transgender student Nicole Maines, center, with her father Wayne Maines, left, and brother Jonas, speaks to reporters outside the Penobscot Judicial Center in Bangor, Maine. The Maine Supreme Judicial Court ruled Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, that Nicole Maines should have been allowed to use the bathroom of her choice in 2009 after school officials required her to use a staff bathroom instead of the girls' restroom. The high court concluded that the Orono school district's actions violated the Maine Human Rights Act, a state law that bans discrimination based on sexual orientation. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)

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