Mark Basseley Youssef

Latest Mark Basseley Youssef Items
  • FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2003 file photo, Judge Alex Kozinski, of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, gestures as Chief Judge Mary Schroeder looks on in San Francisco. A decision by a divided three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco on Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2014, reinstated a lawsuit filed against YouTube by an actress who appeared in an anti-Muslim film that sparked violence in many parts of the Middle East. The 9th Circuit said the YouTube posting infringed actress Cindy Lee Garcia's copyright to her role, and she, not just the filmmaker, could demand its removal. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, Pool, file)

    YouTube ordered to take down anti-Muslim film

    A U.S. appeals court ordered YouTube on Wednesday to take down an anti-Muslim film that sparked violent riots in parts of the Middle East and death threats to the actors.


  • FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2003 file photo, Judge Alex Kozinski, of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, gestures as Chief Judge Mary Schroeder looks on in San Francisco. A decision by a divided three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco on Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2014, reinstated a lawsuit filed against YouTube by an actress who appeared in an anti-Muslim film that sparked violence in many parts of the Middle East. The 9th Circuit said the YouTube posting infringed actress Cindy Lee Garcia's copyright to her role, and she, not just the filmmaker, could demand its removal. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, Pool, file)

    YouTube ordered to take down anti-Muslim film

    A U.S. appeals court ordered YouTube on Wednesday to take down an anti-Muslim film that sparked violent riots in parts of the Middle East and death threats to the actors.


  • **FILE** Mark Basseley Youssef (right) talks with his attorney, Steven Seiden, in a courtroom sketch from Sept. 27, 2012. (Associated Press)

    Benghazi scapegoat remains in prison for film

    The man who made the anti-Islam film that the Obama administration erroneously blamed for the Benghazi terror attacks remains in federal prison eight months later, serving a yearlong sentence for probation violations stemming from his involvement with the video.


  • Anti-Muslim moviemaker may have jihadist ties

    The YouTube video that spawned a wave of violent protests across the Islamic world might be more than a crude exercise in anti-Muslim propaganda. Walid Shoebat, a Middle East pundit and reformed terrorist, says there is reason to believe that the “Innocence of Muslims” video was a hoax designed to spark the huge outpouring of Muslim rage that it did.


  • This courtroom sketch shows Nakoula Basseley Nakoula talking with his attorney Steven Seiden, left, in court Thursday Sept. 27, 2012. The U.S. Central District Chief Magistrate Judge Suzanne Segal on Thursday determined the California man behind a crudely produced anti-Islamic video that inflamed parts of the Middle East is a flight risk and ordered him detained. (AP Photo/Mona Shafer Edwards)

    Man behind anti-Muslim video changed name

    The mystery surrounding the man behind the crudely produced anti-Islamic video that sparked violence in the Middle East deepened when he appeared in court and identified himself by yet another name.


  • Calif man behind anti-Muslim film had many aliases

    Muslims across the Middle East outraged by an anti-Islam film made in America wanted swift punishment for the man behind the movie, and now Mark Basseley Youssef is behind bars. But he's jailed for lying about his identity, not because of the video's content.


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