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Martin Luther King, Jr.

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KING_0215

The Washington Monument is pictured at right as a detail of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is seen ahead of its originally scheduled August dedication in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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The statue of Martin Luther King Jr. is seen unveiled during the soft opening of the civil rights leader's memorial in Washington on Monday, Aug. 22, 2011. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Visitors walk through the large stone mountain "gates" to enter the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington on Monday, Aug. 22, 2011. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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"it's amazing to be here today," said Washington, D.C. native Michael Berry, seen here walking past the sculpture of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who was first in line to see the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial when it opened to the public on Monday, Aug. 22, 2011. Mr. Berry says he was 13 when Dr. King was assassinated, and he remembers the riots and the impact they had on his neighborhood, his city and the nation. He says he'll be coming down again on Sunday for the dedication. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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The sculpture of Martin Luther King Jr. is seen Monday, Aug. 22, 2011, the day that the memorial, the last memorial to be built on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., officially opened to the public. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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A detail of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is pictured on Monday, Aug. 22, 2011, in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. is welcomed with a kiss by his wife Coretta after leaving court in Montgomery, Ala., March 22, 1956. King was found guilty of conspiracy to boycott city buses in a campaign to desegregate the bus system, but a judge suspended his $500 fine pending appeal. (AP Photo/Gene Herrick)

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The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is pictured on Monday, Aug. 22, 2011, in Washington, ahead of its originally scheduled dedication. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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In this Aug. 28, 1963, black-and-white file photo Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses marchers during his "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. DreamWorks Studios announced Tuesday, May 19, 2009 it plans to make a movie about the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., to be co-produced by Steven Spielberg. (AP Photo/File)

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A woman holds the brochure describing the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial as she tours the site on Monday, Aug. 22, 2011, the day the memorial officially opened to the public. The dedication takes place this Sunday, Aug. 28, the 40th anniversary of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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From left, Councilman Vincent Orange, D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray, Councilman Marion Barry and Harry Thompson hold one of the new Martin Luther King Jr. Drive signs at the corner of Maine Avenue and 14th Street Southwest in Washington, D.C. on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011. The men were on sight to officially unveil the street signs that will rename this part of Maine Avenue as Martin Luther King Jr. Drive The road will continue along the Southwest Freeway and join up with the other part of Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Southeast. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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From left, Councilman Vincent Orange, D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray, Councilman Marion Barry and Harry Johnson hold one of the new Martin Luther King Jr. Drive signs at the corner of Maine Avenue and 14th Street Southwest in Washington, D.C. on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011. The men were on sight to officially unveil the street signs that will rename this part of Maine Avenue as Martin Luther King Jr. Drive The road will continue along the Southwest Freeway and join up with the other part of Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Southeast. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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** FILE ** "It's a long time coming," said Davie Feaster, a Washington, D.C., native, about the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, which opened to the public on Aug. 22, 2011. "It's breaking down walls," he said. Mr. Feaster, who was 3 when the March on Washington took place, says even though he was young, he remembers it. His uncle came down to the Mall and handed out chicken to the masses, so as a tribute, he brought chicken on Monday. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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** FILE ** "It's amazing to be here today," said Michael Berry, a Washington, D.C., native. He was first in line to see the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial when it opened to the public on Monday, Aug. 22, 2011. Mr. Berry said he was 13 when King was assassinated, and he remembers the riots and the impact they had on his neighborhood, his city and the nation. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is seen on the National Mall in Washington on Aug., 21, 2011. (Associated Press)

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Visitors to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial take pictures behind security fencing on the National Mall in Washington on Aug., 21, 2011. (Associated Press)

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The Mayor wants use the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial dedication as a platform for arguing state rights for the District. What's up with that? "I'm not sure I see the connection between Martin Luther King and states rights. In my mind Martin Luther King was very much about the federal government being fair to everyone. States rights are about imposing rules on some." Sun King Davis, actor, Southwest

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WUWT_8-GRANT.JPG

The Mayor wants use the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial dedication as a platform for arguing state rights for the District. What's up with that? "They're separate issues, but I think we should address [state rights] now. It takes one person to mess things up, but if everyone is involved we can get something done." Kenneth Grant, Capitol Hill, on disability

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WUWT_8-GRANT.JPG

The Mayor wants use the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial dedication as a platform for arguing state rights for the District. What's up with that? "They're separate issues, but I think we should address [state rights] now. It takes one person to mess things up, but if everyone is involved we can get something done." Kenneth Grant, Capitol Hill, on disability

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WUWT_8-GREEN.JPG

The Mayor wants use the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial dedication as a platform for arguing state rights for the District. What's up with that? "I'm happy [Martin Luther King Jr.] has this platform to begin with. This man struggled to fight for everyone. He struggled for peace. There should be no confrontation about it." Pamela Green, cashier, Capitol Hill