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Tammi_Terrell

Tammi_Terrell

Tammi Terrell (born Thomasina Winifred Montgomery; April 29, 1945 March 16, 1970) best known as a star singer for Motown Records during the 1960s, most notably for a series of duets with singer Marvin Gaye. Terrell's career began as a teenager, first recording for Scepter/Wand Records, before spending nearly two years as a member of James Brown's Revue, recording for Brown's Try Me label. After a period attending college, Terrell recorded briefly for Checker Records, before signing with Motown in 1965. With Gaye, Terrell scored seven Top 40 singles on the Billboard Hot 100, including "Ain't No Mountain High Enough", "Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing" and "You're All I Need to Get By". Terrell's career was interrupted when she collapsed into Gaye's arms as the two performed at a concert at HampdenSydney College on October 14, 1967, with Terrell later being diagnosed with a brain tumor. She had eight unsuccessful surgeries before succumbing to the illness on March 16, 1970 at the age of 24.

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FILE - In this Jan. 17, 1983 file photo, singer-songwriter Marvin Gaye, winner of Favorite Soul/R&B Single, "Sexual Healing," attends the American Music Awards in Los Angeles. The singer's family is seeking to stop the distribution of “Blurred Lines.” Gaye’s children filed a motion in court Tuesday, March 17, 2015, to prevent the copying, distributing and performing of the hit song featuring Pharrell, Robin Thicke and T.I. (AP Photo/Doug Pizac, File)

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Workers build the foundation for a new row house that when finished, will cover the recently painted Marvin Gaye mural in the Shaw Neighborhood, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, August 19, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Workers build the foundation for a new row house that when finished, will cover the recently painted Marvin Gaye mural in the Shaw Neighborhood, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, August 19, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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Workers build the foundation for a new row house that when finished, will cover the recently painted Marvin Gaye mural in the Shaw Neighborhood, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, August 19, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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In this Monday, Oct. 13, 1975, file photo, singer-songwriter Marvin Gaye, left, sits with United Nations Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim, right, and Shirley Temple Black, U.S. Ambassador to Ghana, at the United Nations. Gaye is donating proceeds from his Sunday performance "Salute to the U.N." to UNESCO for an African literacy campaign. Temple, who died at her home near San Francisco, Monday, Feb. 10, 2014, at 85, sang, danced, sobbed and grinned her way into the hearts of Depression-era moviegoers and remains the ultimate child star decades later. (AP Photo/File)

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Pedestrians walk past a mural depicting Marvin Gaye in Shaw as morning snow falls, closing the Federal Government and area schools, Washington, D.C., Tuesday, December 10, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

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The newly renovated Howard Theatre opened a year ago bringing back memories of Duke Ellington, Marvin Gaye and Diana Ross who all played the club when it was a premier entertainment destination. Its amateur night gave young talents such as Ella Fitzgerald and Billy Eckstine their big breaks.

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Those who frequented the Howard Theatre back in the day are impressed with the newly renovated space. Stars including Duke Ellington, Marvin Gaye and Diana Ross once performed at the club, which many residents remember cutting school for to see the shows. The theater will now offer a full-scale kitchen, bar and, of course, live acts. (Barbara L. Sallisbury/The Washington Times)