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Michael Horowitz

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Michael Horowitz, the IG for the Justice Department, said his office's investigations have been seriously delayed. Attempting to investigate accusations of retaliation against whistleblowers at the FBI, Mr. Horowitz said that instead of unfettered access to agency records and communications, the FBI is meticulously reviewing what documents and parts of documents the IG can and can't see. (Associated Press)

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fast-and-furious_live_9_mugshot_four_by_three.jpg

**FILE** House Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa, California Republican, hears Sept. 20, 2012, on Capitol Hill in Washington from Inspector General Michael Horowitz, the Justice Department's internal watchdog, the day after he issued a report faulting the department for disregard of public safety in "Operation Fast and Furious," the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' program that allowed hundreds of guns to reach Mexican drug gangs. (Associated Press)

fast-and-furious_live_6_mugshot_four_by_three.jpg

fast-and-furious_live_6_mugshot_four_by_three.jpg

House Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa, California Republican, hears Sept. 20, 2012, on Capitol Hill in Washington from Inspector General Michael Horowitz, the Justice Department's internal watchdog, the day after he issued a report faulting the department for disregard of public safety in "Operation Fast and Furious," the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' program that allowed hundreds of guns to reach Mexican drug gangs. (Associated Press)

Fast and Furious_Live.jpg

Fast and Furious_Live.jpg

**FILE** House Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa, California Republican, hears Sept. 20, 2012, on Capitol Hill in Washington from Inspector General Michael Horowitz, the Justice Department's internal watchdog, the day after he issued a report faulting the department for disregard of public safety in "Operation Fast and Furious," the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' program that allowed hundreds of guns to reach Mexican drug gangs. (Associated Press)