Topic - Michael Weiner

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • FILE - This April 21, 2011 file photo shows baseball players union head Michael Weiner speaking at a news conference in New York. Weiner, the plain-speaking, ever-positive labor lawyer who took over as head of the powerful baseball players' union four years ago and smoothed the group's perennially contentious relationship with management, died Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013, 15 months after announcing he had been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor. He was 51. A memorial for Weiner was held Monday, Jan. 20, 2014. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)

    Weiner remembered with stories and Springsteen

    With many wearing Converse Chuck Taylor All-Star sneakers and blue jeans in his honor, late baseball players' union head Michael Weiner was remembered during a memorial service Monday night for his courage and grace.

  • New baseball union head Tony Clark is interviewed at the organization's headquarters, in New York,  Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014. Clark says players won't agree to terminating contracts as part of discipline for drug violations. Clark took over as the union's executive director following the death of Michael Weiner in November. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    Clark: MLB players won't allow deals to be voided

    New baseball union head Tony Clark says players won't agree to terminating contracts as part of discipline for drug violations.

  • FILE - This Oct. 1, 2013 file photo shows New York Yankees' Alex Rodriguez arrivng at the offices of Major League Baseball in New York. Rodriguez sued Major League Baseball and its players' union Monday, Jan. 13, 2014 seeking to overturn a season-long suspension imposed by an arbitrator who ruled there was "clear and convincing evidence" he used three banned substances and twice tried to obstruct the sport's drug investigation. (AP Photo/David Karp, file)

    5 things to know about Alex Rodriguez's lawsuit

    Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez sued Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association in an effort to overturn the season-long drug suspension imposed last weekend by arbitrator Fredric Horowitz. Here are five things to know about the complaint filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Manhattan:

  • FOR USE AS DESIRED, YEAR END PHOTOS - FILE - In this March 1958 file photo, St. Louis Cardinals' Stan Musial, with bat in hand, poses for a photo during spring training baseball in Florida. Musial, one of baseball's greatest hitters and a Hall of Famer with the Cardinals for more than two decades, died Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013. He was 92. (AP Photo/File)

    Earl Weaver, Stan Musial among those the world of sports lost in 2013

    The deaths of Stan Musial and Earl Weaver underscored a year of losses in sports: Emile Griffith and Ken Norton in boxing; Bill Sharman and Jerry Buss in basketball; Pat Summerall, on the football field and in the booth; Deacon Jones in the NFL; Ken Venturi in golf; and Michael Weiner, on baseball's labor front.

  • Clark 1st ex-big leaguer to run MLB players' union

    Tony Clark said he's "blown away" that he is the first former major leaguer to become head of the baseball players' union.

  • Union head Weiner's funeral draws Selig, A-Rod

    Michael Weiner's funeral drew baseball Commissioner Bud Selig and New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez, adversaries who did not appear to cross paths during Sunday's service honoring the union leader.

  • MLB players' union head Michael Weiner dies at 51

    Michael Weiner, the plain-speaking, ever-positive labor lawyer who took over as head of the powerful baseball players' union four years ago and smoothed its perennially contentious relationship with management, died Thursday, 15 months after announcing he had been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor. He was 51.

  • Union says drug bans likely not served this year

    The baseball players' association says any suspensions resulting from the sport's latest drug investigation likely won't be served until next year if the discipline is challenged before an arbitrator.

  • Weiner health declines; Clark in line to be deputy

    Confined to a wheelchair, unable to move his right side, Michael Weiner spoke about his brain tumor.

  • Union says drug bans likely not served this year

    The baseball players' association says any suspensions resulting from the sport's latest drug investigation likely won't be served until next year if the discipline is challenged before an arbitrator.

  • Baseball union head assails leaks on drug inquiry

    The head of the players' union said Thursday baseball's drug agreement could be undermined by leaks to the media about whether players are cooperating with an investigation by the commissioner.

  • This undated booking photo provided by the Miami-Dade Police Department, on Tuesday, Jan 29, 2013, shows Anthony Bosch. Major League Baseball says it is "extremely disappointed" about a new report that says records from an anti-aging clinic in the Miami area link New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez and other players to the purchase of performance-enhancing drugs. The Miami New Times said in a story on Tuesday that it had obtained files through an employee at a recently closed clinic called Biogenesis. The report said that the notes of clinic chief Bosch list the players' names and the substances they received, including human growth hormone and steroids. (AP Photo/Miami-Dade Police Department)

    MLB interviewing players in Biogenesis case

    Clinic founder Anthony Bosch has agreed to talk with MLB, according to numerous reports, and union head Michael Weiner said Wednesday the commissioner's office has assured the union that "no decisions regarding discipline have been made or will be made until those interviews are completed."

  • **FILE** In this Nov. 28, 2012 file photo, baseball union head Michael Weiner speaks during a news conference in New York. Weiner says, Monday Feb. 25, 2013, there's active discussion about increasing the penalties for violating baseball's drug testing program. Weiner says players have very little patience for seeing their peers try to cheat the system. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)

    Nationals among players in favor of harsher MLB drug penalties

    With MLB Players' Association representatives in town for their annual meeting with the team, the topic of how to continue to clean up the game arose, as it has at spring training sites across the Grapefruit and Cactus Leagues.

More Stories →

Quotations
  • The union's former executive director, the late Michael Weiner, said back then: "Our members understand that this is a dangerous product, there are serious risks associated with using it. Our players felt strongly that those were appropriate measures to take but that banning its use on the field was not appropriate under the circumstances."

    SNYDER: Tony Gwynn's death reinforces need for baseball tobacco ban →

Happening Now