Topic - Michele M. Leonhart

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    Ex-Guatemalan President Alfonso Portillo extradited to U.S.

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  • Alfonso Portillo (left), former president of Guatemala, speaks to the press May 24, 2013, as he is led by police to an aircraft that will fly him to the United States from Guatemala City. Portillo was extradited to the United States to face charges of laundering $70 million in Guatemalan funds through U.S. bank accounts. (Associated Press)

    Former Guatemalan president in U.S. court after extradition

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  • Michele M. Leonhart

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  • Viktor Bout

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Quotations
  • Mr. Bout and an associate, Richard A. Chichakli, were accused of money-laundering conspiracy, wire-fraud conspiracy, and six separate counts of wire fraud, along with charges of conspiring to purchase two aircraft from companies in the U.S. in violation of economic sanctions that prohibited such financial transactions, said Michele M. Leonhart, acting head of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

    U.S. indicts arms 'Merchant of Death' →

  • She said Mr. Bout agreed to sell the weapons to two sources working with the DEA, who said they were acquiring the weapons for the FARC, with the specific understanding that the weapons were to be used to attack U.S. helicopters in Colombia.

    U.S. indicts arms 'Merchant of Death' →

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