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CORRECTS TO SAY THAT MICROSOFT WILL ELIMINATE UP TO 18,000 INSTEAD OF 18,000 - This July 3, 2014 photo shows Microsoft Corp. signage outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. Microsoft on Thursday, July 17, 2014 announced it will lay off up to 18,000 workers over the next year. (AP Photo Ted S. Warren)

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In this photo taken July 3, 2014, a worker walks past a Microsoft Corp. sign outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. Microsoft on Thursday, July 17, 2014 announced it will lay off 18,000 workers over the next year. (AP Photo Ted S. Warren)

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FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2006 file photo, the logo for Microsoft Corp.'s Media Center Edition of the Windows XP operating system is displayed on a screen at a CompUSA store in Bellevue, Wash. On Tuesday, April 8, 2014, Microsoft will end support for its still popular Windows XP. With an estimated 30 percent of businesses and consumers still using the 12-year-old operating system, the move could put everything from the data of major financial institutions to the identities of everyday people in danger if they don’t find a way to upgrade soon. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

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FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2006 file photo, an upgrade edition of the Microsoft Corp. Windows XP Professional computer operating system is on display at a CompUSA store in Tukwila, Wash. On Tuesday, April 8, 2014, Microsoft will end support for its still popular Windows XP. With an estimated 30 percent of businesses and consumers still using the 12-year-old operating system, the move could put everything from the data of major financial institutions to the identities of everyday people in danger if they don’t find a way to upgrade soon. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

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** FILE ** Microsoft Corp. founder Bill Gates is seen at a Dairy Queen in Beijing, China, Sept. 30, 2010. (Associated Press)

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** FILE ** Microsoft Corp. founder Bill Gates is seen at a Dairy Queen in Beijing, China, Sept. 30, 2010. (Associated Press)

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Marc Whitten, Microsoft Corp.'s chief production officer of interactive entertainment, talks about the features of the next-generation Xbox One entertainment and gaming console system, Tuesday, May 21, 2013, at an event in Redmond, Wash. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

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** FILE ** Microsoft Corp. founder Bill Gates is seen at a Dairy Queen in Beijing, China, Sept. 30, 2010. (Associated Press)

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In this photo taken Jan. 26, 2011, customer Bill Wilson, 82, left, is tutored by technical advisor Jimmy Zhao during a personal training session in a Microsoft Store in Bellevue, Wash. Microsoft Corp. on Thursday, Jan. 27 said its net income for the latest quarter fell slightly from a year ago, and it beat Wall Street's expectations despite the weak personal computer market. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)