Topic - Morsi'S Muslim Brotherhood

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • FILE - In this file photo taken Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2013, Egyptian policemen stand guard at the scene of a powerful explosion, believed to be a car bomb, at a police headquarters building that killed at least a dozen people, wounded more than 100, and left scores buried under the rubble, in the Nile Delta city of Mansoura, 110 kilometers (70 miles) north of Cairo, Egypt. On Saturday May 10, 2014. Egypt's chief prosecutor's office says it has charged 200 suspected militants with carrying out terrorist attacks that killed 40 policeman and 15 civilians, and of conspiring with al-Qaida and the Palestinian militant group Hamas in one of the country's largest terrorism-related cases. (AP Photo/Ahmed Ashraf, File)

    Egypt to try 200 suspected of terrorist attacks

    Egypt's chief prosecutor charged 200 suspected militants Saturday with carrying out over 50 terrorist attacks, killing 40 policemen and 15 civilians and conspiring with the Palestinian militant group Hamas, in the first mass trial of a Jihadi group since the country's recent turmoil.

  • Pro-Muslim Brotherhood students block a road with burning tires and chant slogan against the police and army, outside the main campus of Cairo University, in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, April 23, 2014. The interior ministry blamed the Muslim Brotherhood, the group from which ousted  Islamist President Mohammed Morsi hails and which the government has declared a terrorist group, for two deadly attacks on policemen on Wednesday. The group denies it is behind the violent campaign, and insists it is pursuing a peaceful protest strategy. (AP Photo/Aly Hazzaa, El Shorouk)   EGYPT OUT

    Bomb, shooting in Egypt kills 2 police officers

    A senior Egyptian police officer was killed by a bomb placed under his car in a western Cairo suburb Wednesday, the latest in a series of targeted attacks on police and the military as Islamic militant groups keep up a campaign of violence since last summer's ouster of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi.

  • An Egyptian firefighter checks a crater made by a blast at the Egyptian police headquarters in downtown Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Jan. 24, 2014. Three bombings hit high-profile areas around Cairo on Friday, including a suicide car bomber who struck the city's police headquarters, killing several people in the first major attack on the Egyptian capital as insurgents step up a campaign of violence following the ouster of the Islamist president. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

    Bombings rock Egyptian capital, killing 6 people

    A truck bomb struck the main security headquarters in Cairo on Friday, one of a string of bombings targeting police within a 10-hour period, killing six people. The most significant attack yet in the Egyptian capital fueled a furious backlash against the Muslim Brotherhood amid rising fears of a militant insurgency.

  • Opponents of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Sunday, July 7, 2013. The country's new leadership wrangled over the naming of a prime minister, as both the Muslim Brotherhood and their opponents called for new mass rallies Sunday, renewing fears of another round of street violence over the military's ousting of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

    Egyptian factions work on compromise on premiership as protests continue

    Secular and liberal factions in Egypt's new leadership worked Sunday to reach a compromise with ultraconservative Islamists on a new prime minister, with a liberal economist emerging as a leading candidate for the post to run the country after the military's ouster of President Mohammed Morsi.

  • In this Friday, July 13, 2012 photo, Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi holds a joint news conference with Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki, unseen, at the Presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt's Islamist president may look like he's running out of options as he faces an appeals court strike and massive opposition protests over decrees granting himself near absolute power. Will he back down now? Most likely not. Mohammed Morsi's next move may be to raise the stakes even higher. Signs are growing the constitutional panel at the heart of the showdown could vote on a draft this week despite a walkout by liberal and Christian members. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

    Power struggle in Egypt raises fear of civil war

    The power struggle between Egypt's Islamic and secularist forces intensified Wednesday, with some analysts warning of civil war and supporters of the Islamist government planning to march Saturday on a central square in Cairo where opponents have been holding a sit-in for more than a week.

  • Protesters storm an office of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood Freedom and Justice party in the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria, Egypt, on Nov. 23, 2012, and set fires. State TV says Morsi opponents also set fire to his party's offices in the Suez Canal cities of Suez, Port Said and Ismailia. Opponents and supporters of Morsi clashed across Egypt, the day after the president granted himself sweeping new powers that critics fear can allow him to be a virtual dictator. (Associated Press/Amira Mortada, El Shorouk Newspaper)

    Clashes erupt across Egypt over Morsi's new powers

    Thousands of opponents of Egypt's Islamist president clashed with his supporters in cities across the country Friday, burning several offices of the Muslim Brotherhood, in the most violent and widespread protests since Mohammed Morsi came to power, sparked by his move to grant himself sweeping powers.

More Stories →

Happening Now