Muslim Brotherhood

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    Mideast Egypt Controlling Mosques.JPEG-0d1f9.jpg

    Mideast Egypt Controlling Mosques.JPEG-0d1f9.jpg

    In this Friday, Dec. 20, 2013 photo, Sheik Mohammed Kilani,delivers a Friday sermon at el-Rayan mosque, which attracts Muslim Brotherhood and Salafi followers, in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian authorities are tightening control on mosques around the country, filtering out preachers and seeking to control the message, as the military-backed government cracks down on Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood following his ouster last summer. Some 12,000 clerics have been barred from preaching. The Religious Endowments Ministry, or Awqaf in Arabic, now sets strict guidelines for sermons, and anyone who strays from them in Egypt’s more than 100,000 mosques risks removal. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)


    Mideast Egypt Controlling Mosques.JPEG-0e8a9.jpg

    Mideast Egypt Controlling Mosques.JPEG-0e8a9.jpg

    In this Friday, Dec. 20, 2013 photo, Egyptian worshippers listen to a Friday sermon delivered by cleric Mohammed Kilani at the el-Rayan mosque which attracts Muslim Brotherhood and Salafi followers, in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian authorities are tightening control on mosques around the country, filtering out preachers and seeking to control the message, as the military-backed government cracks down on Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood following his ouster last summer. Some 12,000 clerics have been barred from preaching. The Religious Endowments Ministry, or Awqaf in Arabic, now sets strict guidelines for sermons, and anyone who strays from them in Egypt’s more than 100,000 mosques risks removal. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)


    Mideast Egypt Controlling Mosques.JPEG-08887.jpg

    Mideast Egypt Controlling Mosques.JPEG-08887.jpg

    In this Friday, Dec. 20, 2013 photo, Egyptian worshippers listens to a Friday sermon delivered by cleric Mohammed Kilani, the general director of the civic mosques and head of the committee overseeing the podiums, at el-Rayan mosque, which attracts Muslim Brotherhood and Salafi followers, in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian authorities are tightening control on mosques around the country, filtering out preachers and seeking to control the message, as the military-backed government cracks down on Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood following his ouster last summer.Some 12,000 clerics have been barred from preaching. The Religious Endowments Ministry, or Awqaf in Arabic, now sets strict guidelines for sermons, and anyone who strays from them in Egypt’s more than 100,000 mosques risks removal.(AP Photo/Amr Nabil)


    Turkey Egypt Protest.JPEG-02943.jpg

    Turkey Egypt Protest.JPEG-02943.jpg

    The supporters of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's ruling Justice and Development Party gather outside the Egyptian embassy to protest against an Egyptian court sentencing 529 members of the Muslim Brotherhood to death for murder and other offenses, in Ankara Turkey, Wednesday, April 9, 2014.(AP Photo)


    Turkey Egypt Protest.JPEG-08de7.jpg

    Turkey Egypt Protest.JPEG-08de7.jpg

    The supporters of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's ruling Justice and Development Party gather outside the Egyptian embassy to protest against an Egyptian court sentencing 529 members of the Muslim Brotherhood to death for murder and other offenses, in Ankara Turkey, Wednesday, April 9, 2014.(AP Photo)


    Turkey Egypt Protest.JPEG-05de0.jpg

    Turkey Egypt Protest.JPEG-05de0.jpg

    The supporters of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's ruling Justice and Development Party gather outside the Egyptian embassy to protest against an Egyptian court sentencing 529 members of the Muslim Brotherhood to death for murder and other offenses, in Ankara Turkey, Wednesday, April 9, 2014.(AP Photo)


    854394551f9aa70c4f0f6a7067005a7c.jpg

    854394551f9aa70c4f0f6a7067005a7c.jpg

    FILE - In this file photo taken Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, an Egyptian woman wears a t-shirt with a photo of Egypt's Defense Minister Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi outside a polling station on the first day of voting in the country's constitutional referendum in Cairo, Egypt. Former military chief Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, if he wins Egypt’s presidency as is widely expected, will have an overwhelming presence over a shattered political scene. Egypt’s once dominant political force, the Muslim Brotherhood, is exhausted under a relentless crackdown. Non-Islamist parties are weak and largely acquiescent to his power. But the political vacuum is hardly a stable one. The Brotherhood is betting that with time the public will turn against el-Sissi. (AP Photo/Eman Helal, File)




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