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  • Relatives and mourners of  Shiite pilgrims who were killed on Tuesday by a bomb blast, protest sitting next to their bodies, in Quetta, Pakistan, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. Shiite Muslims in Baluchistan protested Wednesday in Quetta, the capital of Baluchistan, demanding action to stop the continued violence against their sect; they brought the coffins of many of the dead into the streets as part of their protest.  (AP Photo/Arshad Butt)

    HUSAIN: Counting violent Muslim deaths by country in 2014

    More than 37,000 Muslims have been killed in protracted violence in 2014 alone, despite the fact that five months remain in the calendar year. The count takes only a few countries into consideration, including Palestine, Iraq, Syria, Pakistan, Afghanistan, the Central African Republic, and Burma, but the results are chilling nonetheless.

  • Myanmar's Christian rebels carry on fight for survival

    In a shack in the Bum Tsit Pa refugee camp near the Chinese border, a small band of Christians listened quietly to a pastor memorializing a fallen rebel fighter.

  • Myanmar land grab victims turn to black magic

    Victims of land grabs in Myanmar have eagerly tested newfound freedoms by protesting and sending petitions to the president and parliament, to no avail. Now some are turning to old ways: Curses and black magic.

  • Activists free 2 Chinese kidnapped at Myanmar mine

    Two Chinese workers at a copper mine in Myanmar were freed Monday after being held more than 30 hours by activists who were demanding the closure of the mine.

  • In this April 12, 2014 photo, Nay Aung, founder of Oway company poses in his office, Yangon, Myanmar. Nay Aung, a 34-year-old Stanford graduate and former business operations and strategy manager at Google Inc., is among a vanguard of overseas-trained professionals who have returned to Myanmar to find both opportunities and challenges. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

    Myanmar returnees bet on frontier economy's future

    Former Google executive Nay Aung was philosophic as a crisis brewed at the Yangon headquarters of his Oway online travel services company.

  • Embrace Easter hope and forgiveness, archbishop tells Myanmar

    In his Easter message, Archbishop Charles Bo of Yangon, Myanmar, emphasized the hope of the holy day and encouraged the country to seek forgiveness and reconciliation amid past and present conflict.

  • In this Oct. 24, 2013 photo, Win Tin, a former political prisoner and an opposition party stalwart poses for a picture at his home in Yangon, Myanmar. Win Tin, a prominent journalist who became Myanmar's longest-serving political prisoner after challenging military rule by co-founding the National League for Democracy has died. He was 85. He died of renal failure Monday morning, April 21, 2014, family said. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

    Anti-junta Myanmar journalist Win Tin dies at 85

    Win Tin, a prominent journalist who became Myanmar's longest-serving political prisoner after challenging military rule by co-founding the National League for Democracy, died Monday, He was 85.

  • In this Oct. 24, 2013 photo, Win Tin, a former political prisoner and an opposition party stalwart poses for a picture at his home in Yangon, Myanmar. Win Tin, a prominent journalist who became Myanmar's longest-serving political prisoner after challenging military rule by co-founding the National League for Democracy has died. He was 85. He died of renal failure Monday morning, April 21, 2014, family said. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

    Anti-junta Myanmar journalist Win Tin dies at 85

    Win Tin, a prominent journalist who became Myanmar's longest-serving political prisoner after challenging military rule by co-founding the National League for Democracy, died Monday, He was 85.

  • A woman reads a local weekly news journals with its front page printed black with letters saying "By opposing recent arrest and sentencing of journalists including a video journalist of DVB (Democratic Voice of Burma)" Friday, April 11, 2014, in Yangon, Myanmar. Several private newspapers in Myanmar printed black front pages on Friday to protest the recent arrests and sentencing of journalists, in the latest sign the country's media climate is worsening. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

    Myanmar papers protest sentencing of reporters

    Several private newspapers in Myanmar printed black front pages on Friday to protest the recent arrests and sentencing of journalists, in the latest sign the country's media climate is worsening.

  • Myanmar clunkers scrapped in rush for 'new' cars

    Mike Shwe Hlaing has a lot full of used SUVs and a potentially huge market to sell them to if Myanmar manages to spread some of the affluence blooming in its biggest city to a poor and still mostly road-less countryside.

  • Myanmar journalist gets jail time for trespassing

    A court in Myanmar sentenced a journalist to one year in prison for trespassing and obstructing a civil servant while doing a story on education, a spokesman for his media company said Tuesday, in the latest sign the country's media climate is worsening.

  • US optimism ebbs over Myanmar reforms

    Two years after the United States announced the normalization of diplomatic relations with Myanmar, optimism in Washington over the nation's embrace of democracy is waning and concern over the plight of minority Muslims is growing.

  • Aid groups see dire crisis for Rohingya in Myanmar

    International relief organizations forced to flee western Myanmar after being targeted by Buddhist mobs say it will be almost impossible to return without strong diplomatic pressure on the government to depoliticize the distribution of aid: Until then, they say, the lives of more than 140,000 Rohingya Muslims in overcrowded, dirty camps will be at even greater risk.

  • Student interpreter works with refugee families

    Me Meh wants to help people in the Bowling Green area who speak Karenni, one of the three languages in which she is fluent.

  • Anti-genocide group sounds warning about Myanmar

    A former U.S. congressman who visited camps housing tens of thousands of people displaced by communal violence in western Myanmar is warning that minority Rohingya Muslims face a life-threatening lack of medical care and live in fear of attack.

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