Topic - Myanmar

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  • A woman reads a local weekly news journals with its front page printed black with letters saying "By opposing recent arrest and sentencing of journalists including a video journalist of DVB (Democratic Voice of Burma)" Friday, April 11, 2014, in Yangon, Myanmar. Several private newspapers in Myanmar printed black front pages on Friday to protest the recent arrests and sentencing of journalists, in the latest sign the country's media climate is worsening. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

    Myanmar papers protest sentencing of reporters

    Several private newspapers in Myanmar printed black front pages on Friday to protest the recent arrests and sentencing of journalists, in the latest sign the country's media climate is worsening.

  • Myanmar clunkers scrapped in rush for 'new' cars

    Mike Shwe Hlaing has a lot full of used SUVs and a potentially huge market to sell them to if Myanmar manages to spread some of the affluence blooming in its biggest city to a poor and still mostly road-less countryside.

  • Myanmar journalist gets jail time for trespassing

    A court in Myanmar sentenced a journalist to one year in prison for trespassing and obstructing a civil servant while doing a story on education, a spokesman for his media company said Tuesday, in the latest sign the country's media climate is worsening.

  • US optimism ebbs over Myanmar reforms

    Two years after the United States announced the normalization of diplomatic relations with Myanmar, optimism in Washington over the nation's embrace of democracy is waning and concern over the plight of minority Muslims is growing.

  • Aid groups see dire crisis for Rohingya in Myanmar

    International relief organizations forced to flee western Myanmar after being targeted by Buddhist mobs say it will be almost impossible to return without strong diplomatic pressure on the government to depoliticize the distribution of aid: Until then, they say, the lives of more than 140,000 Rohingya Muslims in overcrowded, dirty camps will be at even greater risk.

  • Student interpreter works with refugee families

    Me Meh wants to help people in the Bowling Green area who speak Karenni, one of the three languages in which she is fluent.

  • Anti-genocide group sounds warning about Myanmar

    A former U.S. congressman who visited camps housing tens of thousands of people displaced by communal violence in western Myanmar is warning that minority Rohingya Muslims face a life-threatening lack of medical care and live in fear of attack.

  • In this Jan 28, 2014 photo, addicts use needles at a cemetery in Nampatka village, northeastern Shan State, Myanmar. Every morning, more than 100 heroin and opium addicts descend on the graveyard to get high. Some junkies lean on white tombstones, tossing dirty needles and syringes into the dry, golden grass. Others squat on the ground, sucking from crude pipes fashioned from plastic water bottles. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

    Myanmar opium fight failing; soldiers shooting up

    Every morning, more than 100 heroin and opium addicts descend on the graveyard in this northeastern Myanmar village to get high. When authorities show up, it's for their own quick fix: Soldiers and police roll up the sleeves of their dark green uniforms, seemingly oblivious to passers-by.

  • In this Feb. 27, 2014 photo, Mohamad Frukan stands next to the grave of his wife Noor Jahan, an ethnic Rohingya who died due to kidney disease,  in The' Chaung village, north of Sittwe, Rakhine state, Myanmar. (AP Photo/Pyae Phyo Thant Zin)

    Rohingya dying from lack of health care in Myanmar

    Noor Jahan rocked slowly on the floor, trying to steady her weak body. Her chest heaved and her eyes closed with each raspy breath. She could no longer eat or speak, throwing up even spoonfuls of tea.

  • Suu Kyi foundation for Myanmar based in Hawaii

    Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi's new foundation for health care and education in Myanmar will be based in Hawaii.

  • In this March 2, 2014 photo, Myo Min Htet, left, walks along with Tin Ko Ko, during their wedding reception at Excel Tower in Yangon, Myanmar.  Ten years after they fell in love and moved in together, Tin Ko Ko, 38, and Myo Min Htet, 28, over the weekend became Myanmar's first gay couple to publicly get married. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

    Myanmar couple holds first public gay wedding ceremony

    A gay Myanmar couple married Sunday in a lavish public ceremony that they say was the first of its kind in the country where gay sex is illegal.

  • Doctors Without Borders expelled from Myanmar

    Doctors Without Borders said Friday it has been expelled from Myanmar and that tens of thousands of lives are at risk. The decision came after the humanitarian group reported it treated nearly two dozen Rohingya Muslim victims of communal violence in Rakhine state, which the government has denied.

  • Faith helps anchor Mizo refugees from Myanmar

    Every Sunday, they come from across central Indiana to worship in Greenwood.

  • Myanmar arrests 5 journalists from private journal

    Myanmar has arrested four reporters and the chief executive officer of a private weekly journal for disclosing what it says are "state secrets" following publication of a story about the construction of a defense factory, state-run media reported.

  • Fort Wayne refugees worried about policy changes

    An advocate for Myanmar refugees in Fort Wayne says she's worried that a change in U.S. policy will hurt efforts to reunite them with relatives living in the city.

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