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This artist rendering released by NASA shows NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft barreling through space. The space agency announced Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013, that Voyager 1 has become the first spacecraft to enter interstellar space, or the space between stars, more than three decades after launching from Earth. (AP Photo/NASA)

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This artist rendering released by NASA shows NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft barreling through space. The space agency announced Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013, that Voyager 1 has become the first spacecraft to enter interstellar space, or the space between stars, more than three decades after launching from Earth. (AP Photo/NASA)

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The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer aboard a Minotaur V rocket appears after a rollout at NASA's Wallops Island test flight facility in Wallops Island, Va., Thursday Sept. 5, 2013. The LADEE spacecraft is set to launch from Wallops Island Friday evening. (AP Photo/NASA, Patrick Black)

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The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer aboard a Minotaur V rocket appears after a rollout at NASA's Wallops Island test flight facility in Wallops Island, Va., Thursday Sept. 5, 2013. The LADEE spacecraft is set to launch from Wallops Island Friday evening. (AP Photo/NASA, Patrick Black)

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NASA has asked for suggestions on how to re-purpose three mobile launch platforms, built in 1967, that are going unused at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Each two-story structure weighs around 8.2 million pounds, and is 160 feet long and 135 feet wide.

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NASA has asked for suggestions on how to re-purpose three mobile launch platforms, built in 1967, that are going unused at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Each two-story structure weighs around 8.2 million pounds, and is 160 feet long and 135 feet wide.

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This image provided on Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, by NASA shows the agency's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity using its camera to take this picture showing the rover's arm extended toward a light-toned rock, "Tisdale 2," during the 2,695th Martian day on Aug. 23, 2011. The solar-powered rover beamed back images of the horizon, soil and nearby rocks that are unlike any it has seen during its seven years roaming the Martian plains. (AP Photo/NASA)

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In this image from video made available by NASA, astronauts discuss the aborted spacewalk aboard the International Space Station on Tuesday, July 16, 2013. A dangerous water leak in the helmet of Luca Parmitano, bottom center facing camera in white suit, drenched his eyes, nose and mouth, preventing him from hearing or speaking as what should have been a routine spacewalk came to an abrupt end. (AP Photo/NASA)

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In this image from video made available by NASA, astronauts discuss the aborted spacewalk aboard the International Space Station on Tuesday, July 16, 2013. A dangerous water leak in the helmet of Luca Parmitano, bottom center facing camera in white suit, drenched his eyes, nose and mouth, preventing him from hearing or speaking as what should have been a routine spacewalk came to an abrupt end. (AP Photo/NASA)

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This image released by NASA on May 20, 2013, shows a hole in a Martian rock drilled by the NASA rover Curiosity on May 19. It’s the second drilling by the spacecraft since landing in August 2012. Curiosity used the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on the rover's arm to capture this view of the hole in the rock, dubbed "Cumberland." The diameter of the hole is about 0.6 inch (1.6 centimeters), the depth about 2.6 inches (6.6 centimeters). In the coming days, Curiosity will transfer the rock powder to its onboard instruments to analyze the chemical makeup. (Associated Press/NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

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** FILE ** This image released by NASA on Monday, May 20, 2013, shows a hole in a Martian rock drilled by the NASA rover Curiosity on May 19. It’s the second drilling by the spacecraft since landing in August 2012. Curiosity used the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on the rover's arm to capture this view of the hole in the rock, dubbed "Cumberland." The diameter of the hole is about 0.6 inch (1.6 centimeters), the depth about 2.6 inches (6.6 centimeters). In the coming days, Curiosity will transfer the rock powder to its onboard instruments to analyze the chemical makeup. (Associated Press/NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)

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**FILE** This undated photo released by NASA shows astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. (Associated Press/NASA)

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**FILE** In this April 21, 2008, file photo, Professor Stephen Hawking of the University of Cambridge makes remarks at an event marking the 50th anniversary of NASA, at George Washington University in Washington. (Associated Press)

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** FILE ** This undated image shows an artist's concept of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, rounded module at left, installed on the International Space Station provided by NASA. The cosmic ray detector searched the universe and will help to explain how everything came to be. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, released first results of the experiment Wednesday, April 3, 2013. (AP Photo/NASA)

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** FILE ** This undated image shows an artist's concept of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, rounded module at left, installed on the International Space Station provided by NASA. The cosmic ray detector searched the universe and will help to explain how everything came to be. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, released first results of the experiment Wednesday, April 3, 2013. (AP Photo/NASA)

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The International Space Station (NASA via Associated Press)

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This image provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech shows a simulation of asteroid 2012 DA14 approaching from the south as it passes through the Earth-moon system on Feb. 15, 2013. The 150-foot object will pass within 17,000 miles of the Earth. NASA scientists insist there is absolutely no chance of a collision as it passes. (AP Photo/NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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This image provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech shows a simulation of asteroid 2012 DA14 approaching from the south as it passes through the Earth-moon system on Feb. 15, 2013. The 150-foot object will pass within 17,000 miles of the Earth. NASA scientists insist there is absolutely no chance of a collision as it passes. (AP Photo/NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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Closest Asteroid_Lea.jpg

This image provided by NASA/JPL-Caltech shows a simulation of asteroid 2012 DA14 approaching from the south as it passes through the Earth-moon system on Feb. 15, 2013. The 150-foot object will pass within 17,000 miles of the Earth. NASA scientists insist there is absolutely no chance of a collision as it passes. (AP Photo/NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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Astronaut Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969. (AP Photo/NASA/Neil A. Armstrong) Conspiracy theorists have claimed that photos of the lunar landings are bogus due to: a lack of visible stars; inconsistent shadows and lighting that seem to track with a studio production; what looks like the letter “C†written on a moon rock and the lunar surface; an Australian woman’s alleged claim that she saw a soft drink bottle in the frame while watching one of the manned landings take place on live television. NASA has provided plausible explanations for all of the above: Stars weren’t visible due to the brightness of the sun during the lunar daytime; inconsistent shadows and lighting were the result of lens distortion, lunar dust, uneven ground and multiple light sources; the “C†shape does not appear in original lunar camera film and is believed to be a coiled hair that made its way into the printing processes