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FILE - This undated file photo provided by NASA shows astronauts Mark Kelly, right, and Scott Kelly in the check-out facility at Ellington Field near NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. Scott and his twin Mark are taking part in an unprecedented study of identical twins looking into the effects of prolonged weightlessness. Mark will undergo tests on Earth while his brother Scott will embark on a one-year space station stint. (AP Photo/NASA, File)

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FILE - This Oct. 5, 2011 file satellite photo provided by NASA shows algae blooms on Lake Erie. U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announces a new program under which the federal government will spend $1.2 billion over five years supporting conservation projects designed by universities, private companies, nonprofits and other local partners. An April, 2013, study said the warming climate and modern farming practices are creating ideal conditions for gigantic algae formations on Lake Erie. (AP Photo/NASA, File)

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Head of US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, Charles Bolden, speaks during a press conference in Berlin, Monday, May 19, 2014. The head of NASA has dismissed concerns that friction with Russia might spell the end of the International Space Station. Russia’s deputy prime minister said last week that his country wouldn’t cooperate with the United States on the project beyond 2020. The move followed a decision by the United States to impose sanctions on Russia over its actions in Ukraine. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said Monday that the space station is run jointly by the U.S., Russia, Japan, Europe and Canada, and no single partner can terminate the project. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

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US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, Charles Bolden speaks during a press conference in Berlin, Monday, May 19, 2014. The head of NASA has dismissed concerns that friction with Russia might spell the end of the International Space Station. Russia’s deputy prime minister said last week that his country wouldn’t cooperate with the United States on the project beyond 2020. The move followed a decision by the United States to impose sanctions on Russia over its actions in Ukraine. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said Monday that the space station is run jointly by the U.S., Russia, Japan, Europe and Canada, and no single partner can terminate the project. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

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Head of US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, Charles Bolden, speaks during a press conference in Berlin, Monday, May 19, 2014. The head of NASA has dismissed concerns that friction with Russia might spell the end of the International Space Station. Russia’s deputy prime minister said last week that his country wouldn’t cooperate with the United States on the project beyond 2020. The move followed a decision by the United States to impose sanctions on Russia over its actions in Ukraine. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden said Monday that the space station is run jointly by the U.S., Russia, Japan, Europe and Canada, and no single partner can terminate the project. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)