Topic - National Association Of Broadcasters

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  • ** FILE ** Justin Timberlake reaches across Janet Jackson just before uncovering her right breast during the halftime performance at Super Bowl XXXVIII in Houston in 2004. (Associated Press)

    TV viewers weary of nudity and obscenity look for decency from FCC nominee

    The future of long-standing government bans on obscenity and nudity on the airwaves soon could become much clearer as President Obama's pick to head the Federal Communications Commission faces a Senate confirmation hearing Tuesday — one day before the public comment period on the policy ends.

  • Music royalty talks consider cell phone mandate

    A long-running dispute between radio broadcasters and the recording industry over music royalties has taken an unexpected turn with a proposed settlement that threatens to drag the mobile phone industry into the ring.

  • Hostility to XM merger grows

    To those who thought the National Association of Broadcasters couldn't yell any louder in opposing the proposed merger of XM Satellite Radio and Sirius Satellite Radio, think again.

  • NAB resists push for royalties

    A "performance tax on local radio." That's how the National Association of Broadcasters is characterizing a recording industry push for compensation from over-the-air radio stations for music played on the public airwaves.

  • NAB resists push for royalties

    A "performance tax on local radio." That's how the National Association of Broadcasters is characterizing a recording industry push for compensation from over-the-air radio stations for music played on the public airwaves.

  • Approve the Sirius/XM merger

    If we thought that the nation's two satellite-radio services — Sirius and XM — would each become a long-term going concern in the foreseeable future, we would be at the front of the line opposing their merger. If there were any evidence suggesting that Sirius and XM's respective losses of $1.1 billion and $732 million last year would soon evolve into respectable profits, we would oppose their merger. If there were evidence indicating that their separate operations, which so far have generated cumulative cash-flow deficits totaling $10 billion, would eventually produce positive cash flows within a reasonable period of time (even if losses continued), we would oppose their merger. If their combined share of the radio-listening market were 34 percent rather than the 3.4 percent it actually is, we would oppose their merger. If the combined 2006 broadcasting revenues of XM and Sirius were 27 percent of the revenues captured by commercial terrestrial (AM/FM) radio broadcasters rather than the 7 percent that they actually are, then we would oppose an XM-Sirius merger.

  • Merger plan leaves XM headquarters intact

    XM Satellite Radio and Sirius Satellite Radio said they plan to keep the approximately 800 employees based in the District and their local building if their proposed merger is approved.

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