Skip to content

National Capital Planning Commission

Latest Stories

122_2013_dc-height-restrictions-28201.jpg

122_2013_dc-height-restrictions-28201.jpg

Harriet Tregoning, director of the District of Columbia Office of Planning, and Marcel Acosta, executive director of the National Capital Planning Commission, gave differing views Monday about whether height limits on buildings in the District should be eased. Restrictions were passed 103 years ago to preserve the view of landmarks such as the Capitol (below in 1931, bottom in 2001). Those in favor of an easing say it will help the District expand its tax base. Harriet Tregoning, director of the District of Columbia Office of Planning, left, and Marcel Acosta, executive director of the National Capital Planning Commission, right, are sworn in on Capitol Hill in Washington, Momday, Dec. 2, 2013, prior to testifying before the House Oversight Committee hearing about whether the historic height limits on buildings in Washington, D.C., should be changed. The Height Act of 1910 generally requires that buildings in the District of Columbia be no taller than the width of the streets they face. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) (associated press photographs)

20110628-202948-pic-374396319.jpg

20110628-202948-pic-374396319.jpg

Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times Alan Ward with Sasaki Associates, a Watertown, Mass.-based architectural-design firm, presents his company's plans for a new design for President's Park South, also known as the Ellipse, to the National Capital Planning Commission on Tuesday. Five design firms from around the country were selected to present designs.