Topic - National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

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  • Analysis: Recent California newspaper editorials

    April 15

  • US agency closes probe into Ford pickup trucks

    U.S. safety regulators have decided against seeking a recall of Ford F-150 pickup trucks after investigating complaints about reduced power in EcoBoost engines.

  • Glenn County Sheriff's officers walk past the remains of a tour bus that was struck by a FedEx truck on Interstate 5 Thursday in Orland, Calif., Friday, April 11, 2014. At least ten people were killed and dozens injured in the fiery crash between the truck and a bus carrying high school students on a visit to a Northern California College. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

    Rules lag to help passengers escape crashed buses

    Safety standards to make large buses easier for passengers to escape after a crash have not been adopted 15 years after accident investigators called for new rules.

  • Gov't: GM missed deadline for faulty switch data

    A government safety agency is fining General Motors $7,000 a day, saying the company failed to fully respond to its requests for information about a faulty ignition switch by an April 3 deadline.

  • Major events in GM's recall of 2.6M small cars

    Congress, the Justice Department and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are all investigating General Motors Co.'s recall of 2.6 million vehicles for an ignition switch defect which can cause the car to stall and deactivate the air bags. GM links the defect to 13 deaths and more than two dozen crashes.

  • ** FILE ** This photo taken Jan. 23, 2014, shows General Motors CEO Mary Barra addressing the media during a roundtable meeting with journalists in Detroit. Barra will be asked by two congressional subcommittees why it took GM a decade to recall cars with faulty ignition switches that the company says are now linked to 13 deaths. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)

    GM, safety agency face Congress over recalls

    Congress will press General Motors' new CEO at a hearing Tuesday about why GM sold cars with an ignition switch that failed to meet its own specifications, and then failed to heed the recommendations of engineers to fix the part.

  • Auto safety chief says GM didn't share key data

    A federal safety regulator says General Motors didn't share key information that might have led to a faster recall of small cars.

  • Congress: GM twice failed to fix defect

    General Motors discussed two separate fixes for an ignition switch defect in 2005 but canceled both of them without taking action, according to a memo released Sunday by the House subcommittee investigating GM's handling of the defect and a subsequent recall.

  • AP IMPACT: Gov't safety agency missed Cobalt clues

    For years, the U.S. government's auto safety watchdog sent form letters to worried owners of the Chevrolet Cobalt and other General Motors small cars, saying it didn't have enough information about problems with unexpected stalling to establish a trend or open an investigation.

  • Customers check out a new Tesla all electric car, Monday, March 17, 2014, at a Tesla showroom inside the Kenwood Towne Centre in Cincinnati. Ohio auto dealers are sparring at the Statehouse with the California-based Tesla, which is selling it's next generation electric cars from three Ohio storefronts. Lawmakers in Ohio and other states are trying to block Tesla direct sales on grounds they undercut traditional auto dealerships. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

    Feds close investigation of Tesla battery fires

    The U.S. government's auto safety watchdog has closed an investigation into Tesla electric car battery fires after the company said it would install more shields beneath the cars.

  • Major events in GM's recall of 1.6 million cars

    Congress, the Justice Department and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are all investigating General Motors Co.'s recall last month of 1.6 million vehicles for an ignition switch defect which can cause the car to stall and deactivate the air bags. The defect is linked to 12 deaths.

  • AP IMPACT: Gov't safety agency missed Cobalt clues

    For years, the U.S. government's auto safety watchdog sent form letters to worried owners of the Chevrolet Cobalt and other General Motors small cars, saying it didn't have enough information about problems with unexpected stalling to establish a trend or open an investigation.

  • Toyota payment could be glimpse into GM's future

    General Motors, beware.

  • Attorney General Eric Holder, left, accompanied byTransportation Secretary Anthony Foxx, announces a $1.2 billion settlement with Toyota over its disclosure of safety problems, Wednesday, March 19, 2014, during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

    U.S. files charge against Toyota, $1.2B penalty

    The government announced a $1.2 billion settlement with Toyota Motor Corp. on Wednesday and filed a criminal charge alleging the company defrauded consumers by issuing misleading statements about safety issues in Toyota and Lexus vehicles.

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, June 15, 2010, photo, workers at General Motors' Lordstown Assembly plant in Lordstown, Ohio put the final touches on Chevy Cobalts. U.S. safety regulators are demanding that General Motors turn over documents detailing what the company knew when about a dangerous ignition problem that has been linked to 13 car-crash deaths. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)

    GM at fault for 303 airbag-related deaths: safety group

    General Motors' woes have gotten a bit worse. A safety report shows that airbag deployment issues in 1.6 million recently recalled vehicles possibly contributed to the deaths of 303 people — far greater than GM's reported toll of 12 deaths related to the vehicles.

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