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auto_safety_chief_five_questions_85465.jpg

FILE - In this May 4, 2016 file photo, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration administrator Mark Rosekind speaks during a news conference to announce the addition of tens of millions of Takata air bag inflators to the largest automotive recall in history in Washington. Rosekind, who leaves his job leading the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration on Friday, Jan. 20, 2017, said the agency has taken steps to modernize and change its relationship with automakers so they try to stop problems rather than reacting to deaths and injuries. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

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This undated image taken from video shows the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ( NHTSA) crash test of a 2005 General Motors Cobalt. For years, the U.S. government’s auto safety watchdog sent form letters to worried owners of the Chevrolet Cobalt and other General Motors small cars, saying it didn’t have enough information about problems with unexpected stalling to establish a trend or open an investigation, however an Associated Press review released Friday, March, 28, 2014, of complaints to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration shows that over a nine-year period, 164 drivers reported that their 2005-2007 Chevrolet Cobalts stalled without warning (AP Photo/NHTSA)

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This undated image taken from video shows the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ( NHTSA) crash test of a 2005 General Motors Cobalt. For years, the U.S. government’s auto safety watchdog sent form letters to worried owners of the Chevrolet Cobalt and other General Motors small cars, saying it didn’t have enough information about problems with unexpected stalling to establish a trend or open an investigation, however an Associated Press review released Friday, March, 28, 2014, of complaints to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration shows that over a nine-year period, 164 drivers reported that their 2005-2007 Chevrolet Cobalts stalled without warning (AP Photo/NHTSA)

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General Motors-Recall-Watchdog Warned.JPEG-0737a.jpg

This undated image taken from video shows the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ( NHTSA) crash test of a 2005 General Motors Cobalt. For years, the U.S. government’s auto safety watchdog sent form letters to worried owners of the Chevrolet Cobalt and other General Motors small cars, saying it didn’t have enough information about problems with unexpected stalling to establish a trend or open an investigation, however an Associated Press review released Friday, March, 28, 2014, of complaints to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration shows that over a nine-year period, 164 drivers reported that their 2005-2007 Chevrolet Cobalts stalled without warning (AP Photo/NHTSA)

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"We recognize that vehicle manufacturers want to build vehicles that include the tools and conveniences expected by today's American drivers," said National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Administrator David Strickland. (Associated Press)

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Toyota_Recall_Webe.jpg

**FILE** Fe Lastrella, left, who lost family members in an accident Involving a Toyota, Kevin Haggerty, who experienced sudden unintended acceleration in a Toyota, Joan Claybrook, President Emeritus of Public Citizen and former administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Clarence Ditlow, Executive Director, Center for Auto Safety, are sworn in before testifying before the House Oversight and Government Reform about Toyota on Capitol Hill in Washington Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2010. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)