National Labor Relations Board

Latest National Labor Relations Board Items
  • 'CONCERNED': Rep. John Kline, Minnesota Republican, says he is worried about not having enough troops in Afghanistan to "provide defensive protection." He faults President Obama's troops cap. (Associated Press)

    EDITORIAL: Protect workers from union bosses

    Labor unions can't persuade Congress to destroy workplace voting rights, but their Obama-appointed lackeys at the National Labor Relations Board do their dirty work anyway. Twice in the past six weeks, the NLRB has sided with union bosses over ordinary workers, smothering the ideal of secret elections.


  • Homer Ryan, son of jailed former Illinois Gov. George Ryan, is comforted by his wife, Amy, as he speaks to reporters about a judge's denial of his father's bid for early release to be with his dying wife. (Associated Press)

    Political Scene

    Most private employers would have to display posters informing workers about their right to form a union under a proposed federal rule that is bound to please unions and draw the ire of companies trying to resist labor organizers.


  • Feds: Woman illegally fired over Facebook remarks

    A Connecticut woman who was fired after she posted disparaging remarks about her boss on Facebook has prompted a first-of-its-kind legal case by federal authorities who say her comments are protected speech under labor laws.


  • A lawyer reviews his notes during a lunch break in a trial. Maya Alleruzzo/ The Washington Times.

    EDITORIAL: Lawyers, goons and money

    The autocratic nature of the Obama administration becomes ever more clear with each end run around Congress and each attempt to bully state legislatures and private companies into submission.


  • Court forces 500 labor board cases to be reopened

    More than 500 decisions by the leading federal agency that referees disputes between labor and management will have to be reopened after the Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the five-member board had operated illegally when its membership dwindled to two.


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