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western_wildfires_80867.jpg

This satellite imagery, posted Wednesday, July 19, 2017 on a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration website, shows a large plume of smoke spreading hundreds of miles east from the Ditwiler fire, near Yosemite National Park in California's Sierra Nevada. Authorities say the stubborn wildfire burning in foothills west of Yosemite had destroyed dozens of structures while forcing thousands of people from their homes Wednesday. The San Francisco Bay Area is at left; Lake Tahoe is at top center. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)

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california_tangled_whale_81211.jpg

This undated photo provided by NOAA shows a humpback whale entangled in fishing line, ropes, buoys and anchors in the Pacific Ocean off Crescent City, Calif. Rescuers freed the badly tangled humpback whale Tuesday, July 18, 2017, after it had struggled for days against the weight of fishing lines, buoys and anchors dragging it to the ocean floor off California. Team leader Pieter Folkens says freeing the whale took nearly eight hours. (Bryant Anderson/NOAA Fisheries MMHSRP Permit# 18786-01 via AP)

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tropical_weather_82572.jpg

This satellite image taken Tuesday, June 20, 2017, and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows a tropical storm over the Gulf of Mexico approaching the Gulf Coast. Tropical Storm Cindy hovered over the Gulf of Mexico south of Louisiana on Tuesday, churning tides and spinning bands of rain over the central and eastern Gulf Coast. (NOAA via AP)

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shipwreck_discovery_82356.jpg

This undated underwater image provided by NOAA shows a 6-pounder gun located on the starboard bow of the USCG Cutter McCulloch. Researchers discovered the remains of a San Francisco-based U.S. Coast Guard cutter that first set out to sea during the Spanish American War and sank off the coast of Southern California 100 years ago, officials announced. On Tuesday, June 13, 2017, officials will host a news conference to highlight the ship's history and to pay tribute to the ship and its crews, including two crewmen who died in the line of duty. (NOAA/USCG/VideoRay via AP)

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shipwreck_discovery_59427.jpg

In this undated underwater image provided by NOAA, a fish swims past a circular skylight collapsed inside the officer's quarters in the stern of the shipwreck USCG Cutter McCulloch. Researchers discovered the remains of a San Francisco-based U.S. Coast Guard cutter that first set out to sea during the Spanish American War and sank off the coast of Southern California 100 years ago, officials announced. On Tuesday, June 13, 2017, officials will host a news conference to highlight the ship's history and to pay tribute to the ship and its crews, including two crewmen who died in the line of duty. (NOAA/USCG/Video Ray via AP)

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shipwreck_discovery_66299.jpg

This undated image provided by NOAA shows the USCG Cutter McCulloch that was launched in 1896. Researchers discovered the remains of a San Francisco-based U.S. Coast Guard cutter that first set out to sea during the Spanish American War and sank off the coast of Southern California 100 years ago, officials announced. On Tuesday, June 13, 2017, officials will host a news conference to highlight the ship's history and to pay tribute to the ship and its crews, including two crewmen who died in the line of duty. (NOAA/Mare Island Museum via AP)

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hurricane_season_18253.jpg

In this photo taken Friday, May 12, 2017, a NOAA sea glider on display for reporters and guests, Friday, May 12, 2017, at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Miami, at the Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport, in Opa-locka, Fla. NOAA again will launch four underwater gliders from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands to collect ocean data, and this summer the agency will expand its data pool by collaborating with universities and research institutions in the U.S. and Bermuda that have up to 20 their own gliders in the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

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In this photo taken March 28, 2017, Bill Fairgrieve, a fisheries research biologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, checks on a tank housing sablefish at a research facility in Manchester, Wash. Scientists are studying sablefish genetics and investigating ways to make it easier and more efficient to commercially grow and farm the fish as part of a larger effort by NOAA to support marine aquaculture as a possible solution to feed a growing demand worldwide for seafood. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

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growing_sablefish_35226.jpg

In this photo taken March 28, 2017, Bill Fairgrieve, a fisheries research biologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, holds a sablefish at a research facility in Manchester, Wash. Scientists are studying sablefish genetics and investigating ways to make it easier and more efficient to commercially grow and farm the fish as part of a larger effort by NOAA to support marine aquaculture as a possible solution to feed a growing demand worldwide for seafood. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

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This undated photo provided by NOAA Fisheries captured on a remote camera stationed at Cape Wrangell on Attu Island, Alaska, which is the farthest western point of the United States, shows Stellar sea lions. The NOAA Fisheries scientists are using crowdsourcing volunteers to help study why the population of sea lions in the Aleutian Islands has not recovered. Volunteers are reviewing thousands of photos to determine whether they show any sea lions. (NOAA Fisheries via AP)

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alaska_sea_lions_citizen_research_88605.jpg

This 2016 photo provided by NOAA Fisheries, shows a harem of Stellar sea lions with one large male, several females and their pups on Gillon Point at Agattu Island, Alaska. The NOAA Fisheries scientists are using crowdsourcing volunteers to help study why the population of sea lions in the Aleutian Islands has not recovered. Volunteers are reviewing thousands of photos to determine whether they show any sea lions. (Katie Sweeney/NOAA Fisheries via AP)

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endangered_seal_death_aquaculture_35629.jpg

In this undated photo provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, an endangered Hawaiian monk seal known as RB18 lies on the shore of Hawaii's Big Island. The monk seal has died after wandering into a net pen and becoming trapped at a fish farm that was partially funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Hawaii. Officials with NOAA said Thursday, March 16, 2017, the death of the 10-year-old monk seal happened at Blue Ocean Mariculture. (Julie Steelman/NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service via AP)

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endangered_seal_death_aquaculture_38926.jpg

In this undated photo provided by NOAA, an endangered Hawaiian monk seal known as RB18 lies on the shore of Hawaii's Big Island. The monk seal has died after wandering into a net pen and becoming trapped at a fish farm that was partially funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Hawaii. Officials with NOAA said Thursday, March 16, 2017, the death of the 10-year-old monk seal happened at Blue Ocean Mariculture, the same fish farm that NOAA's National Marine Fishery Service has been using for research in conjunction with a plan to expand aquaculture into federal waters around the Pacific. (Julie Steelman/NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service via AP)

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winter_weather_29729.jpg

This satellite image taken around 12:12 a.m. EDT and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, shows clouds around the Northeast of the United States, Tuesday, March 14, 2017. A powerful nor'easter could bring blizzard conditions and more than a foot of snow from the mid-Atlantic to parts of the Northeast, and officials warn of potential beach erosion, possible coastal flooding and power outages from the late-season snowstorm. (NOAA via AP)

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winter_weather_98166.jpg

This satellite image taken around 12:12 a.m. EDT and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, shows clouds around the Northeast of the United States, Tuesday, March 14, 2017. A powerful nor'easter could bring blizzard conditions and more than a foot of snow from the mid-Atlantic to parts of the Northeast, and officials warn of potential beach erosion, possible coastal flooding and power outages from the late-season snowstorm. (NOAA via AP)

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winter_weather_45066.jpg

This satellite image taken around 3:12 p.m. EDT and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, shows clouds around the Northeast of the United States, Monday, March 13, 2017. A powerful nor'easter could bring blizzard conditions and more than a foot of snow from the mid-Atlantic to parts of the Northeast, and officials warn of potential beach erosion, possible coastal flooding and power outages from the late-season snowstorm. (NOAA via AP)

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lightning_mapper_84646.jpg

In this mage provided by NOAA shows some of the first images from it's new satellite that maps lightning. A new U.S. satellite is mapping lightning flashes worldwide from above, which should provide better warning about dangerous strikes. NOAA released the first images from a satellite launched last November that had the first lightning detector in geostationary orbit. It includes bright flashes from a storm that spawned tornadoes and hail in the Houston region on Valentine’s Day. (NOAA via AP)

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FILE - This undated photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows a thorny skate, a bottom-dwelling fish whose habitat in the In the north Atlantic Ocean ranges from Greenland to South Carolina. The federal government says the thorny skate will not be listed under the Endangered Species Act. Environmental groups argued that the thorny skate's decline in the northwest Atlantic Ocean was considerable enough to afford it protections set aside for endangered animals. But the National Marine Fisheries Service says it disagrees.(T. Curtis/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)

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california_storms_51042.jpg

In this Feb. 17, 2017 satellite image released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Satellite and Information Service's GOES-West, shows a powerful storm beginning to move into California as the saturated state faces a new round of wet weather that could trigger flooding and debris flows around the northern region. The brunt of the storm is expected to affect Southern California starting around midday Friday and into Saturday. Forecasters say rain will also spread into Central California and up to the San Francisco Bay Area. But the National Weather Service says only scattered light showers are occurring in the region north of Sacramento, where the damaged Oroville Dam continues to release water in advance of new storms. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)

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california_storms_54844.jpg

In this Friday, Feb. 17, 2017 satellite image released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows a powerful storm beginning to move into California as the saturated state faces a new round of wet weather that could trigger flooding and debris flows around the northern region. The brunt of the storm is expected to affect Southern California starting around midday Friday and into Saturday. Forecasters say rain will also spread into Central California and up to the San Francisco Bay Area. But the National Weather Service says only scattered light showers are occurring in the region north of Sacramento, where the damaged Oroville Dam continues to release water in advance of new storms. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)