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alaska_sea_lions_citizen_research_35685.jpg

alaska_sea_lions_citizen_research_35685.jpg

This undated photo provided by NOAA Fisheries captured on a remote camera stationed at Cape Wrangell on Attu Island, Alaska, which is the farthest western point of the United States, shows Stellar sea lions. The NOAA Fisheries scientists are using crowdsourcing volunteers to help study why the population of sea lions in the Aleutian Islands has not recovered. Volunteers are reviewing thousands of photos to determine whether they show any sea lions. (NOAA Fisheries via AP)

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alaska_sea_lions_citizen_research_88605.jpg

This 2016 photo provided by NOAA Fisheries, shows a harem of Stellar sea lions with one large male, several females and their pups on Gillon Point at Agattu Island, Alaska. The NOAA Fisheries scientists are using crowdsourcing volunteers to help study why the population of sea lions in the Aleutian Islands has not recovered. Volunteers are reviewing thousands of photos to determine whether they show any sea lions. (Katie Sweeney/NOAA Fisheries via AP)

endangered_seal_death_aquaculture_35629.jpg

endangered_seal_death_aquaculture_35629.jpg

In this undated photo provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, an endangered Hawaiian monk seal known as RB18 lies on the shore of Hawaii's Big Island. The monk seal has died after wandering into a net pen and becoming trapped at a fish farm that was partially funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Hawaii. Officials with NOAA said Thursday, March 16, 2017, the death of the 10-year-old monk seal happened at Blue Ocean Mariculture. (Julie Steelman/NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service via AP)

endangered_seal_death_aquaculture_38926.jpg

endangered_seal_death_aquaculture_38926.jpg

In this undated photo provided by NOAA, an endangered Hawaiian monk seal known as RB18 lies on the shore of Hawaii's Big Island. The monk seal has died after wandering into a net pen and becoming trapped at a fish farm that was partially funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Hawaii. Officials with NOAA said Thursday, March 16, 2017, the death of the 10-year-old monk seal happened at Blue Ocean Mariculture, the same fish farm that NOAA's National Marine Fishery Service has been using for research in conjunction with a plan to expand aquaculture into federal waters around the Pacific. (Julie Steelman/NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service via AP)

winter_weather_29729.jpg

winter_weather_29729.jpg

This satellite image taken around 12:12 a.m. EDT and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, shows clouds around the Northeast of the United States, Tuesday, March 14, 2017. A powerful nor'easter could bring blizzard conditions and more than a foot of snow from the mid-Atlantic to parts of the Northeast, and officials warn of potential beach erosion, possible coastal flooding and power outages from the late-season snowstorm. (NOAA via AP)

winter_weather_98166.jpg

winter_weather_98166.jpg

This satellite image taken around 12:12 a.m. EDT and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, shows clouds around the Northeast of the United States, Tuesday, March 14, 2017. A powerful nor'easter could bring blizzard conditions and more than a foot of snow from the mid-Atlantic to parts of the Northeast, and officials warn of potential beach erosion, possible coastal flooding and power outages from the late-season snowstorm. (NOAA via AP)

winter_weather_45066.jpg

winter_weather_45066.jpg

This satellite image taken around 3:12 p.m. EDT and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, shows clouds around the Northeast of the United States, Monday, March 13, 2017. A powerful nor'easter could bring blizzard conditions and more than a foot of snow from the mid-Atlantic to parts of the Northeast, and officials warn of potential beach erosion, possible coastal flooding and power outages from the late-season snowstorm. (NOAA via AP)

lightning_mapper_84646.jpg

lightning_mapper_84646.jpg

In this mage provided by NOAA shows some of the first images from it's new satellite that maps lightning. A new U.S. satellite is mapping lightning flashes worldwide from above, which should provide better warning about dangerous strikes. NOAA released the first images from a satellite launched last November that had the first lightning detector in geostationary orbit. It includes bright flashes from a storm that spawned tornadoes and hail in the Houston region on Valentine’s Day. (NOAA via AP)

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thorny_skate_73287.jpg

FILE - This undated photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows a thorny skate, a bottom-dwelling fish whose habitat in the In the north Atlantic Ocean ranges from Greenland to South Carolina. The federal government says the thorny skate will not be listed under the Endangered Species Act. Environmental groups argued that the thorny skate's decline in the northwest Atlantic Ocean was considerable enough to afford it protections set aside for endangered animals. But the National Marine Fisheries Service says it disagrees.(T. Curtis/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)

california_storms_51042.jpg

california_storms_51042.jpg

In this Feb. 17, 2017 satellite image released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Satellite and Information Service's GOES-West, shows a powerful storm beginning to move into California as the saturated state faces a new round of wet weather that could trigger flooding and debris flows around the northern region. The brunt of the storm is expected to affect Southern California starting around midday Friday and into Saturday. Forecasters say rain will also spread into Central California and up to the San Francisco Bay Area. But the National Weather Service says only scattered light showers are occurring in the region north of Sacramento, where the damaged Oroville Dam continues to release water in advance of new storms. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)

california_storms_54844.jpg

california_storms_54844.jpg

In this Friday, Feb. 17, 2017 satellite image released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows a powerful storm beginning to move into California as the saturated state faces a new round of wet weather that could trigger flooding and debris flows around the northern region. The brunt of the storm is expected to affect Southern California starting around midday Friday and into Saturday. Forecasters say rain will also spread into Central California and up to the San Francisco Bay Area. But the National Weather Service says only scattered light showers are occurring in the region north of Sacramento, where the damaged Oroville Dam continues to release water in advance of new storms. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)

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northeast_snow_83809.jpg

This National Weather Service RIDGE Radar image provided by NOAA shows a storm system moving across the United States, Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017, at 10:48 p.m. EST. A densely populated swath of the Northeast was preparing for winter's harshest thump yet, a fast-moving storm that could bring more than a foot of snow, strong winds and coastal flooding. (NOAA via AP)

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mackerel_volcano_00999.jpg

In this 1891 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Penobscot Bay fishermen clean mackerel near their saltwater farm off the Maine coast. Scientists with the University of Massachusetts and other institutions made the findings while conducting research about a long-ago climate calamity in New England that was caused by the eruption of Mount Tambora in Indonesia in 1815. (NOAA/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP)

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fewer_mild_days_73605.jpg

In this image provided by Karin van der Wiel/ NOAA/ Princeton University, shows climate change effects on patterns of mild weather. Kiss goodbye some of those postcard-perfect, ideal-for-outdoor-wedding days. A new study said global warming is going to steal some of those exceedingly pleasant weather days from our future. On average, Earth will have four fewer days of mild and mostly dry weather by 2035 and ten fewer of them by the end of the century, according to a first-of-its-kind projection of nice weather. (Karin van der Wiel/ NOAA/ Princeton University via AP)

hungry_planet_fish_farms_19685.jpg

hungry_planet_fish_farms_19685.jpg

In this Sept. 17, 2015, image made from video provided by NOAA Fisheries, a diver swims near a fish farm off the shore of Hawaii's Big Island near Kona. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is creating a plan for managing commercial fish farms, known as aquaculture, in federal waters around the Pacific - a program similar to one recently implemented by NOAA in the Gulf of Mexico. The farms in the Gulf and the Pacific would be the only aquaculture operations in U.S. federal waters. (Paul B. Hillman/NOAA Fisheries via AP)

hungry_planet_fish_farms_12591.jpg

hungry_planet_fish_farms_12591.jpg

In this Sept. 17, 2015, image made from video provided by NOAA Fisheries, a diver swims amongst a fish farm off the shore of Hawaii's Big Island near Kona. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is creating a plan for managing commercial fish farms, known as aquaculture, in federal waters around the Pacific - a program similar to one recently implemented by NOAA in the Gulf of Mexico. The farms in the Gulf and the Pacific would be the only aquaculture operations in U.S. federal waters. (Paul B. Hillman/NOAA Fisheries via AP)

hungry_planet_fish_farms_22110.jpg

hungry_planet_fish_farms_22110.jpg

This Sept. 17, 2015, image made from video provided by NOAA Fisheries, shows a fish farm off the shore of Hawaii's Big Island near Kona. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is creating a plan for managing commercial fish farms, known as aquaculture, in federal waters around the Pacific - a program similar to one recently implemented by NOAA in the Gulf of Mexico. The farms in the Gulf and the Pacific would be the only aquaculture operations in U.S. federal waters. (Paul B. Hillman/NOAA Fisheries via AP)

hurricane_matthew_october_7_2016_45022.jpg

hurricane_matthew_october_7_2016_45022.jpg

This image provided by NOAA. taken Oct. 7, 2016, shows Hurricane Matthew over the Southeastern part of the U.S. A new study finds wind and water shifts during busy hurricane seasons seem to provide a somewhat protective barrier for the U.S. coast. Last year’s Hurricane Matthew, which was a major storm and hit Haiti with 145 mph winds but fizzled as it neared the American mainland, is a good example.This Oct. 7, 2016 satellite image shows Matthew as it threatens Florida, but it later hit South Carolina as a minimal hurricane with 75 mph winds. (NOAA via AP)

hurricane_barrier_20660.jpg

hurricane_barrier_20660.jpg

This image provided by NOAA NCEI shows a hurricane buffer zone on the Southeastern part of the U.S. A new study finds that subtle shifts in winds and water temperature during busy hurricane seasons often ends up providing a protective barrier or buffer that often weakens storms as they approach the U.S. coast. This handout image from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Center for Environmental Information shows where the buffer zone is, based on ocean temperatures and changes in winds over decades. (NOAA NCEI via AP)

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puget_sound_orcas.jpeg

FILE - This September 2015 photo provided by NOAA Fisheries shows an adult female orca, identified as J-16, as she's about to surface with her youngest calf, born earlier in the year, near the San Juan Islands in Washington state's Puget Sound. Whale researchers who track the small endangered population of Puget Sound orcas say three whales are believed dead or missing since summer. The Center for Whale Research says that as of Friday, Oct. 28, 2016, there are only 80 animals. Two females and a 10-month old calf are believed gone. (NOAA Fisheries/Vancouver Aquarium via AP, File)