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After the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service was awarded to The Washington Post, reporters and editors gather in the newsroom in Washington Monday, April 14, 2014, as contributing writer Barton Gellman describes the effort that went into a series of stories on the government’s massive surveillance program based on information leaked by National Security Agency employee Edward Snowden. The disclosures showed that the NSA has collected information about millions of Americans’ phone calls and emails based on its classified interpretations of laws passed after the 2001 terrorist attacks. The Pulitzer Prizes, journalism’s highest honor, are given out each year by Columbia University on the recommendation of a board of journalists and others. This is Gellman’s third Pulitzer honor. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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After the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service was awarded to The Washington Post, reporters and editors gather in the newsroom in Washington, Monday, April 14, 2014, as contributing writer Barton Gellman describes the effort that went into a series of stories on the government’s massive surveillance program based on information leaked by National Security Agency employee Edward Snowden. The disclosures showed that the NSA has collected information about millions of Americans’ phone calls and emails based on its classified interpretations of laws passed after the 2001 terrorist attacks. The Pulitzer Prizes, journalism’s highest honor, are given out each year by Columbia University on the recommendation of a board of journalists and others. This is Gellman’s third Pulitzer honor. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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Sen. Ron Wyden, Oregon Democrat, said the National Security Agency "has knowingly acquired tens of thousands of wholly domestic communications even though this law was specifically written to prohibit the warrantless acquisition of wholly domestic communications." (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

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** FILE ** In this June 18, 2013, file photo, House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich. listens to testimony on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 18, 2013, by National Security Agency Gen. Keith B. Alexander. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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FILE - This June 6, 2013, file photo, shows a sign outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. The Senate Intelligence Committee three years ago secretly considered, but ultimately rejected, alternate ways for the National Security Agency to collect and store massive amounts of Americans’ phone records, The Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

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FILE - This June 6, 2013, file photo, shows a sign outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. The Senate Intelligence Committee three years ago secretly considered, but ultimately rejected, alternate ways for the National Security Agency to collect and store massive amounts of Americans’ phone records, The Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

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House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., right, accompanied by the committee's ranking member Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md., inform reporters about proposed changes to the National Security Agency’s program of sweeping up and storing vast amounts of data on Americans' phone calls, Tuesday, March 25, 214, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Details of the government's secret phone records collection program were disclosed last year by former NSA systems analyst Edward Snowden. Privacy advocates were outraged to learn that the government was holding onto phone records of innocent Americans for up to five years. Obama promised to make changes to the program in an effort to win back public support. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)