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Obama NSA Surveillance.JPEG-0b018.jpg

Obama NSA Surveillance.JPEG-0b018.jpg

President Barack Obama talks about National Security Agency (NSA)surveillance, Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, at the Justice Department in Washington.Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, the president called for ending the government's control of phone data from -hundreds of millions of Americans and immediately ordered intelligence agencies to get a secretive court's permission before accessing the records. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

obama-nsa-surveillancejpeg-0321c_mugshot_four_by_three.jpg

obama-nsa-surveillancejpeg-0321c_mugshot_four_by_three.jpg

President Barack Obama talks about National Security Agency (NSA)surveillance, Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, at the Justice Department in Washington.Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, the president called for ending the government's control of phone data from -hundreds of millions of Americans and immediately ordered intelligence agencies to get a secretive court's permission before accessing the records. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Obama NSA Surveillance.JPEG-0321c.jpg

Obama NSA Surveillance.JPEG-0321c.jpg

President Barack Obama talks about National Security Agency (NSA)surveillance, Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, at the Justice Department in Washington.Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, the president called for ending the government's control of phone data from -hundreds of millions of Americans and immediately ordered intelligence agencies to get a secretive court's permission before accessing the records. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

obama-nsa-surveillancejpeg-02093_mugshot_four_by_three.jpg

obama-nsa-surveillancejpeg-02093_mugshot_four_by_three.jpg

President Barack Obama pauses while speaking about National Security Agency (NSA)surveillance, Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, at the Justice Department in Washington. Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, the president called for ending the government's control of phone data from hundreds of millions of Americans and immediately ordered intelligence agencies to get a secretive court's permission before accessing the records. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Obama NSA Surveillance.JPEG-02093.jpg

Obama NSA Surveillance.JPEG-02093.jpg

President Barack Obama pauses while speaking about National Security Agency (NSA)surveillance, Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, at the Justice Department in Washington. Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, the president called for ending the government's control of phone data from hundreds of millions of Americans and immediately ordered intelligence agencies to get a secretive court's permission before accessing the records. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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2_f2ee2b86f904d901480f6a706700bc24_mugshot_four_by_three.jpg

FILE - This June 6, 2013 file photo shows the sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md. Telephone companies are quietly balking at the idea of changing how they collect and store Americans’ phone records to help the NSA’s surveillance programs. They’re worried about their exposure to lawsuits and the price tag if the U.S. government asks them to hold information about customers for longer than they already do. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

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FILE - This Thursday, June 6, 2013, file photo, shows a sign outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. The National Security Agency has implanted software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world — but not in the United States — that allows the U.S. to conduct surveillance on those machines, The New York Times reported Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014. ((AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)