National Security Agency

Latest National Security Agency Items
  • ** FILE ** This Sunday, June 9, 2013, file photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, in Hong Kong. Snowden has left Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport and entered Russia his lawyer said on Thursday Aug. 1, 2013. (AP Photo/The Guardian, Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, File)

    EDITORIAL: The Whistleblower

    Many Americans think Edward J. Snowden is a criminal, or worse, for revealing government secrets, however pernicious. Others, who put their faith in limited government, think blowing the whistle on this surveillance does the country a service.


  • ** FILE ** This Sunday, June 9, 2013, file photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, in Hong Kong. Snowden has left Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport and entered Russia his lawyer said on Thursday Aug. 1, 2013. (AP Photo/The Guardian, Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, File)

    Extremists take more security measures in wake of NSA leak

    Extremists are sharing media reports about the National Security Agency's telecommunications surveillance program and are urging each other to increase their security.


  • ** FILE ** President Barack Obama pauses while speaking in San Jose, Calif., Friday, June 7, 2013. The president defended his government's secret surveillance, saying Congress has repeatedly authorized the collection of America's phone records and U.S. Internet use. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    Obama blamed for NSA spying revelations by whistleblower advocate group

    An advocate for government whistleblowers blamed the Obama administration Tuesday for failing to provide protections for intelligence employees who want to report abuses and wrongdoing, as authorities intensified their global manhunt for national-security leaker Edward Snowden.


  • This photo provided by The Guardian Newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, on Sunday, June 9, 2013, in Hong Kong. The Guardian identified Snowden as a source for its reports on intelligence programs after he asked the newspaper to do so on Sunday. (AP Photo/The Guardian)

    Lawmakers hit contractors' pay in NSA leak scandal

    Lawmakers pointed to the National Security Agency contractor who leaked top secret information about NSA's telecommunications surveillance program as a consequence of a bloated, expensive contracting workforce.


  • Demonstrators hold signs supporting Edward Snowden in New York's Union Square Park on June 10, 2013. Snowden, who says he worked as a contractor at the National Security Agency and the CIA, gave classified documents to reporters, making public two sweeping U.S. surveillance programs and touching off a national debate on privacy versus security. (Associated Press)

    Privacy groups demand end to NSA snooping programs

    An advocate for government whistleblowers blamed the Obama administration Tuesday for failing to provide protections for intelligence employees who want to report abuses and wrongdoing, as authorities intensified their global manhunt for National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden.


  • Illustration by Linas Garsys for The Washington Times

    GAFFNEY: Crossing the line on metadata

    The revelation that the super-secret National Security Agency (NSA) has been vacuuming up so-called "metadata" from foreign and American communications has lots of us in a full-scale flail.


  • **FILE** Glenn Beck (Associated Press)

    Glenn Beck, Michael Moore call NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden a hero

    Conservative radio commentator Glenn Beck and liberal Hollywood movie-maker Michael Moore have found common ground on the National Security Agency whistleblower, Edward Snowden: He's a hero.


  • **FILE** James Clapper, Director of National Intelligence, listens to testimony at the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, where he testified about worldwide threats. (Associated Press)

    Officials say Americans protected by Prism surveillance program

    Current and former officials say the now-declassified Prism Internet surveillance program — contrary to privacy advocates' fears — targets only foreigners, has been authorized by Congress, and is regularly vetted by the courts and independent auditors working for the Justice Department's inspector general.


  • John Kinley Tener, a former professional baseball player who served in the House of Representatives and was governor of Pennsylvania, established the Congressional Baseball Game in 1909. (Library of Congress)

    Inside the Beltway: Is Edward Snowden a hero or villain?

    "Edward Snowden is a national hero and should be immediately issued a full, free and absolute pardon for any crimes he has committed or may have committed related to blowing the whistle on secret National Security Agency surveillance programs." And so reads a White House "We the People" online petition established Sunday


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