Natural Resources - Bio, News, Photos - Washington Times
Skip to content

Natural Resources

Latest Stories

damaged_dam_30116.jpg

damaged_dam_30116.jpg

Natural Resources Secretary John Laird, right, discusses the damaged spillway on the Oroville Dam during a hearing of the Senate Committee on Natural Resources and Water, Tuesday, April 25, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. Laird, and Bill Croyle, left, the acting director of the Department of Water Resources, updated lawmakers on the actions taken to repair the damaged spillway that caused the evacuation of nearly 200,000 people downstream of the Oroville Dam in February. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

washington_landslide_68588.jpg

washington_landslide_68588.jpg

This April 8, 2017 photo provided by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources shows state geologist Dave Norman, right, and geotechnical engineer Gabe Taylor inspecting the head scarp of a landslide slide on State Route 530 near the town of Oso in northwestern Oregon.The discovery of the slow-moving landslide near the site of a 2014 Washington state mudslide that killed 43 people has prompted transportation officials to close until Thursday, April 13, as a precaution. (Washington State Department of Natural Resources via AP)

10102014_surinamenewmontphot8201.jpg

10102014_surinamenewmontphot8201.jpg

Signing ceremony of the mineral agreement between Surgold (Newmont) and the Republic of Suriname for the Merian project, Jim Hok, Minister of Natural Resources (left) Adriaan Van Kersen, Managing Director of Surgold (right).

116ab3c3277f0414550f6a7067000090.jpg

116ab3c3277f0414550f6a7067000090.jpg

ADVANCE FOR USE MONDAY, MAY 26, 2014, AND THEREAFTER- In this Aug. 10, 2011 photo taken and provided by John Lyons, fisheries research scientist with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, a group of scientists in Wisconsin cast nets in Middle Kimball Lake in Minong, Wis. Scientists in Wisconsin and Minnesota are studying the remaining populations of cisco, a fish that scientists and anglers say leads to bigger musky and walleye. The fish are native to the area and are under threat from climate change. (AP Photo/Courtesy of The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, John Lyons)