Navy

Latest Navy Items
  • A poster warns of the effects of the drug known as 'Spice' at the Naval Hospital in San Diego. The Navy has investigated more than 700 sailors and Marines this year for smoking the "synthetic" marijuana.  (Associated Press)

    Fake pot a growing problem in the military

    U.S. troops are increasingly using an easy-to-get herbal mix called "Spice" that mimics a marijuana high, is hard to detect and can bring on hallucinations that last for days.


  • A poster warning of the effects of the drug known as 'spice' hangs on a wall Dec. 6, 2011, at the Naval Hospital in San Diego. The U.S. Navy kicked out a record number of sailors and Marines in 2011 for smoking synthetic marijuana and has seen a dramatic jump in emergency room visits of its users, including some who babbled or hallucinated for eight days. (Associated Press)

    'Synthetic' marijuana is problem for U.S. military

    U.S. troops are increasingly using an easy-to-get herbal mix called "Spice," which mimics a marijuana high, is hard to detect and can bring on hallucinations that last for days.


  • BOOK REVIEW: 'Admiral Nimitz'

    Brayton Harris' "Admiral Nimitz" is the easy-to-read story of the career of the nation's foremost Navy flag officer of the 20th century. Mr. Harris has done an admirable job of condensing a long and colorful career into a mere 256 pages.


  • American Scene

    A Navy tradition caught up with the repeal of the U.S. military's "don't ask, don't tell" rule on Wednesday when two female sailors became the first to share the coveted "first kiss" on the pier after one of them returned from 80 days at sea.


  • BOOK REVIEW: '1812: The Navy's War'

    With the bicentennial of the War of 1812 soon upon us, a plethora of books on the subject are in the market. Some treat individual actions or single theaters. Some deal with politics, and some deal with diplomacy, but "1812: The Navy's War" deals with it all.


  • U.S. Navy via Associated Press
Lawmakers acceded to the president's request that funding for the Air Force's F-22 Raptor plane be ended in the defense appropriations legislation that he privately signed into law on Monday.

    EDITORIAL: Navy blue goes green

    The $1 trillion budget bill before Congress includes a provision that would resurrect the Keystone XL pipeline, but don't expect its passage to open a flood of black gold and wash away Uncle Sam's infatuation with all things green. Even as the scientific validation of global-warming theory crumbles, adherents in Washington have dragooned the U.S. military into leading the charge toward renewable energy.


  • Grenades in nabbed cartel leader's arsenal

    Mexican authorities said Tuesday that an alleged founder of the Zeta drug cartel had an arsenal of 169 guns when he was captured Monday, and may have been linked to the abduction of nine Mexican marines.


  • Navy's exuberance was evident before kickoff, as the Mids followed the flag onto the field. (Andrew Harnik / The Washington Times)

    Win over Army gives Navy jump on 2012

    Navy didn't produce a flawless season.


  • Navy Midshipmen fullback Alexander Teich had 883 yards rushing and four touchdowns last season. (Andrew Harnik / The Washington Times)

    HELLER: Army-Navy clash would be even better if teams kept up with the times

    There's nothing in sports quite like an Army-Navy football game. The color and pageantry, emotion and ebullience, are marvelous to behold. And when the nation's two highest elected officials are in attendance, as President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden were Saturday at FedEx Field, we are reminded anew just how important and unique is this 111-year-old sporting spectacle. The problem, you see, is that they insist on playing a 1925 football game as part of it.


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