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Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo ll mission commander, at the modular equipment storage assembly (MESA) of the Lunar Module "Eagle" on the historic first extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. took the photograph with a Hasselblad 70mm camera. Most photos from the Apollo 11 mission show Buzz Aldrin. This is one of only a few that show Neil Armstrong (some of these are blurry).

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** FILE ** In this July 20, 1969, file photo provided by NASA, astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, smiles for a photo inside the Lunar Module while it rested on the lunar surface. Armstrong was first out the lunar module, Eagle, onto the dusty surface of Tranquility Base. (AP Photo/NASA, File)

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This was the scene along Main Street as thousands jammed the streets to honor the Apollo 11 astronauts, August 16, 1969, Houston, Tex. Neil A. Armstrong rides in the first auto, followed Edwin E. Aldrin and Michael Collins. (AP Photo)

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Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., lunar module pilot, descends steps of Lunar Module ladder as he prepares to walk on the moon, July 20, 1969. This picture was taken by astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Commander, with a 70mm surface camera. (AP Photo/NASA/Neil A. Armstrong)

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Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, prepares to deploy the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP) during Apollo 11 lunar surface extravehicular activity, July 20, 1969. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this photograph with a 70 mm lunar surface camera. Aldrin is removing the EASEP from its stowed position. (AP Photo/NASA/Neil A. Armstrong)

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Astronaut Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969. (AP Photo/NASA/Neil A. Armstrong) Conspiracy theorists have claimed that photos of the lunar landings are bogus due to: a lack of visible stars; inconsistent shadows and lighting that seem to track with a studio production; what looks like the letter “C†written on a moon rock and the lunar surface; an Australian woman’s alleged claim that she saw a soft drink bottle in the frame while watching one of the manned landings take place on live television. NASA has provided plausible explanations for all of the above: Stars weren’t visible due to the brightness of the sun during the lunar daytime; inconsistent shadows and lighting were the result of lens distortion, lunar dust, uneven ground and multiple light sources; the “C†shape does not appear in original lunar camera film and is believed to be a coiled hair that made its way into the printing processes

FAKE_19690720_8937

FAKE_19690720_8937

Astronaut Edwin E. "Buzz" Aldrin Jr. poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969. (AP Photo/NASA/Neil A. Armstrong) Conspiracy theorists have claimed that photos of the lunar landings are bogus due to: a lack of visible stars; inconsistent shadows and lighting that seem to track with a studio production; what looks like the letter “C†written on a moon rock and the lunar surface; an Australian woman’s alleged claim that she saw a soft drink bottle in the frame while watching one of the manned landings take place on live television. NASA has provided plausible explanations for all of the above: Stars weren’t visible due to the brightness of the sun during the lunar daytime; inconsistent shadows and lighting were the result of lens distortion, lunar dust, uneven ground and multiple light sources; the “C†shape does not appear in original lunar camera film and is believed to be a coiled hair that made its way into the printing processes