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Nixon

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Illustration comparing Hillary's crimes to Nixon's by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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Illustration on the similarities of Nixon and Clinton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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Illustration on Nixon's support of Title IX and the subsequent growth of women's sports by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

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Nixon's presidential library is built on 9 acres of land in Yorba Linda, California, alongside his restored childhood home. After the Watergate scandal and Nixon's resignation, the president was forced to turn over most of his materials and documents from his presidency. These artifacts were preserved and eventually included in the Library when it was built almost two decades later in 1990. In addition to photographs, videos, and interactive presentations about Nixon's presidency, guests can also visit his childhood home and enter the helicopter that served as Marine One for Nixon and various other presidents.

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Nixon and the Space Shuttle Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

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This undated handout image provided by the National Archives shows Richard Nixon’s application to be an FBI Special Agent, April 29, 1937 Upon graduating from Duke Law School in 1937, Nixon submitted this application to be a special agent in the FBI. He never heard back after his interview. Assuming he didn’t get the job, he returned home to California, passed the bar, and began practicing law. Many years later Nixon learned from FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover that he had been accepted, but his appointment was held back due to budget cuts. National Archives, Records of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Curators at the National Archives have culled their collection in search of some of the great signatures of history. A special exhibit opening Friday includes the personal marks of figures that include Thomas Jefferson, Frank Sinatra, Jackie Robinson, Adolf Hitler and Saddam Hussein, along with important documents from history. Curators looked at the power of the pen in politics, war, entertainment and sports for the wide-ranging exhibit, "Making their Mark." (AP Photo/National Archives)

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"Our Nixon," which debuts Thursday at 9 p.m. on CNN, is a feature-length documentary on President Nixon crafted from 500 reels of home movies.

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"Our Nixon," which debuts Thursday at 9 p.m. on CNN, is a feature-length documentary on President Nixon crafted from 500 reels of home movies.

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President Nixon waves goodbye to staff members outside the White House after resigning on Aug. 9, 1974. Mr. Felt tipped off reporters to the Watergate scandal that toppled Mr. Nixon.

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President Nixon waves goodbye to staff members outside the White House after resigning on Aug. 9, 1974, following revelations of the Watergate and other scandals.

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ASSOCIATED PRESS John McCain is greeted by President Nixon in Washington in September 1973, after Mr. McCain spent more than five years in a Vietnamese prisoner-of-war camp known as the "Hanoi Hilton."