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  • **FILE** National Security Adviser Susan Rice (Associated Press)

    Susan Rice denies Edward Snowden was a government spy

    National Security Adviser Susan Rice was unequivocal in her response to CNN's Wolf Blitzer, when he asked if Edward Snowden had been employed as a government spy for the CIA and NSA: No, she said.


  • ** FILE ** A Sunday, June 9, 2013, file photo provided by The Guardian newspaper in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the U.S. National Security Agency. (AP Photo/The Guardian, File)

    Post, Guardian win Pulitzers for NSA revelations

    The Washington Post and The Guardian won the Pulitzer Prize in public service Monday for revealing the U.S. government's sweeping surveillance programs in a blockbuster series of stories based on secret documents supplied by NSA leaker Edward Snowden.


  • ** FILE ** Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden speaks during a presentation ceremony for the Sam Adams Award in Moscow in this image made from video and released by WikiLeaks on Friday, Oct. 11, 2013. (AP Photo)

    White House cyber chief: Snowden damage will be felt for decades

    Damage to U.S. national security caused by NSA contractor Edward Snowden will take decades to repair, the White House official in charge of cyber security said Friday.


  • From left, FBI Director James Comey, CIA Director John Brennan, and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper sit together in the front row before President Barack Obama spoke about National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance, Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, at the Justice Department in Washington. The president called for ending the government's control of phone data from millions of Americans. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Lawmakers skeptical about Obama surveillance idea

    Leaders of the congressional intelligence committees are pushing back against a key part of President Barack Obama's attempt to overhaul U.S. surveillance, saying it is unworkable for the government to let someone else control how Americans' phone records are stored.


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