Topic - Old Elk

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  • From left, Hunter Old Elk, 17, Calista Monroy, 13, Brooke Stevenson and Devin Kills Back, 15, get into Native American dress of the Crow and Northern Cheyenne tribes before performing at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, Jan. 15, 2012 as part of the Winter Storytelling Festival. The young women are part of the St. Labre Indian School Dance Troupe from Ashland, Mont. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

    Indian rhythms keep cultures alive

    A rhythmic beat, chanting and jingling bells greeted visitors Sunday to the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, where students from the drum-and-dance group from Montana's St. Labre Indian School performed as part of the museum's Winter Storytelling Festival.

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Quotations
  • "This is what our culture does," said Hunter Old Elk, a 17-year-old member of the Crow tribe. "It really helps to preserve tradition in our own way. My family are all dancers. It's a big thing. For me, I didn't want to be the oddball out."

    Indian rhythms keep cultures alive →

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