Topic - Pakistani Government

Subscribe to this topic via RSS or ATOM
Related Stories
  • FILE - In this Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013 file photo, Pakistani Taliban spokesman Shahidullah Shahid, center, flanked by his bodyguards, talks to reporters at an undisclosed location in Pakistani tribal area of Waziristan along Afghanistan border. The Pakistani Taliban announced Saturday that the group will observe a one-month cease-fire as part of efforts to negotiate a peace deal with the government, throwing new life into a foundering peace process. Spokesman Shahidullah Shahid said in a statement emailed to reporters that the top leadership of the militant group has instructed all of its units to comply with the cease-fire. (AP Photo/Ishtiaq Mahsud, File)

    Pakistani officials hold direct talks with Taliban

    A Pakistani government team held direct talks with the Taliban after traveling Wednesday to a secret location in the country's northwest, part of a push by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif to strike a peace deal to end an insurgency that has killed thousands of people in recent years.

  • In this Monday, Feb. 3, 2014 photo, negotiators from Pakistani Taliban committee, from left, to right Ibrahim Khan, Maulana Sami-ul-Haq and Maulana Abdul Aziz, listen to a reporter during their press conference in Islamabad, Pakistan. The Pakistani government has recently opened negotiations with domestic militants called the Pakistani Taliban designed to end years of fighting in the northwest that has cost thousands of lives and forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes. (AP Photo/Anjum Naveed)

    Pakistan-Taliban peace talks: What's at stake?

    The Pakistani government has recently opened negotiations with domestic militants called the Pakistani Taliban designed to end years of fighting in the northwest that has cost thousands of lives and forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes. A look at some of the main issues involved in the talks:

  • People look at the wreckage of a passenger bus destroyed in a bomb blast in the Mastong district, near Quetta, Pakistan, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014. A roadside car bomb hit a bus of Shiite pilgrims returning from Iran, killing several people and wounding many, in restive Baluchistan province, said a top security official. (AP Photo/Arshad Butt)

    Pakistani air force pounds militant hide-outs

    The Pakistani air force pounded militant hide-outs near the Afghan border on Tuesday, killing dozens of people following deadly bombings against security forces in recent days.

  • Supporters of Tehreek-e-Insaf or Movement for Justice party chant anti-U.S. slogans during a rally in Peshawar, Pakistan, Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013. Thousands of people protesting U.S. drone strikes blocked a road in northwest Pakistan used to truck NATO troop supplies and equipment in and out of Afghanistan, the latest sign of rising tension caused by the attacks. (AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad)

    NATO supply line blocked by Pakistani drone protesters

    Thousands of people protesting U.S. drone strikes blocked a road in northwest Pakistan on Saturday used to truck NATO troop supplies and equipment in and out of Afghanistan, the latest sign of rising tension caused by the attacks.

  • FILE -  In this Sunday, Oct. 4, 2009 file photo, Pakistani Taliban chief Hakimullah Mehsud,  right, holds a rocket launcher with his comrades in Sararogha of Pakistani tribal area of South Waziristan along the Afghanistan border. Intelligence officials said Friday, Nov. 1, 2013 that the leader of the Pakistani Taliban Hakimullah Mehsud was one of three people killed in a U.S. drone strike. (AP Photo/Ishtiaq Mehsud, File)

    Pakistan: Taliban leader who attacked CIA base killed in U.S. drone strike

    The Pakistani Taliban confirmed the death of their leader in a U.S. drone strike Saturday, a day after he was killed, as the group's leadership council met to begin the process of choosing a successor.

  • ** FILE ** An unmanned U.S. Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field in southern Afghanistan on a moonlit night in January 2010. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

    Pakistan: 3 percent of deaths from U.S. drone strikes were civilians

    The Pakistani government said Wednesday that 3 percent of the people killed in U.S. drone strikes since 2008 were civilians, a surprisingly low figure that could alter the highly negative public perception of the attacks.

  • Pakistani army doctors and medical staff transport 14-year-old schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, who was shot Tuesday by the Taliban, from a military hospital to the airport in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, on Monday, Oct. 15, 2012, for an airlift to England. (AP Photo/Inter Services Public Relations Department)

    Pakistani girl shot by Taliban now in U.K. for care

    A teenage Pakistani activist shot in the head by the Taliban arrived in Britain on Monday to receive specialized medical care and protection from follow-up attacks threatened by the militants. Officials said she is stable and has a chance at "a good recovery."

  • Imran Khan (top left), a Pakistani cricket-star-turned-politician, addresses supporters during a peace march in Mianwali, Pakistan, on Saturday, Oct. 6, 2012. Thousands of Pakistanis joined by a group of U.S. anti-war activists headed toward Pakistan's militant-riddled tribal belt Saturday to protest U.S. drone strikes, even as a Pakistani Taliban faction warned that suicide bombers would stop the demonstration. (AP Photo/Jabbar Ahmed)

    Pakistan blocks anti-U.S. protest in tribal region

    The Pakistani military blocked a convoy carrying thousands of Pakistanis and a small contingent of U.S. anti-war activists from entering a lawless tribal region along the border with Afghanistan on Sunday to protest American drone strikes.

  • Supporters of a Pakistani religious group demonstrate against a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad in Lahore, Pakistan, on Sunday, Sept. 23, 2012. (AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary)

    Pakistan disavows bounty on anti-Islam filmmaker

    The Pakistani government on Monday distanced itself from an offer by one of its Cabinet ministers to pay $100,000 for anyone who kills the maker of an anti-Islam film, saying the offer does not represent official government policy.

  • Foreign child relief staff ousted from Pakistan

    The Pakistani government has ordered foreign staff members of Save the Children to leave the country, a spokesman for the international aid group said Thursday.

  • Hundreds of Christian families who fled their neighborhood where a girl was arrested on blasphemy charges sit in a public park for protection in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Tuesday. They feared retribution from Muslim neighbors if they stayed in their homes. (Associated Press)

    Fearful Pakistani Christians make home in forest

    In the middle of a forest in the Pakistani capital, a group of Christians has cut down trees to clear land and has begun to build a church out of branches after leaving their neighborhood in fear when one of their own was accused of violating Pakistan's strict blasphemy laws.

  • World Briefs: Taliban video shows 17 beheaded soldiers

    The Taliban released a video Wednesday that they say shows the heads of 17 Pakistani soldiers captured in a cross-border raid from Afghanistan this week and beheaded.

  • America, Pakistan and never having to say sorry

    Say you're sorry. That's what the Pakistani government says it wants from the United States in order to jump-start a number of initiatives between the two countries that would help the hunt for al Qaeda in Pakistan and smooth the end of the war in Afghanistan.

  • ** FILE ** Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari (AP Photo/Anjum Naveed)

    NATO invites Pakistan to summit in Chicago

    NATO on Tuesday invited Pakistan's president to the upcoming Chicago summit on Afghanistan, the strongest sign yet that Islamabad is ready to reopen its western border to U.S. and NATO military supplies heading to the war in the neighboring country.

  • On Sunday, April 22, 2012, relatives and other mourners in Karachi, Pakistan, carry the coffins of a couple who were killed in the crash of a Bhoja Air Boeing 737 on the outskirts of Islamabad on Friday. All 127 people on board died. (AP Photo)

    Pakistan orders new plane inspection after crash

    The Pakistani government mandated Sunday that all airplanes operated by private airlines must undergo a new inspection to determine whether they are safe to fly, days after a crash near the capital killed 127 people.

More Stories →

Happening Now