Topic - Paul A. Quander Jr.

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  • Fire Chief Kenneth Ellerbe, through a spokesperson, declined to discuss the action taken against Battalion Fire Chief Kevin B. Sloan. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)

    Wells calls for resignation of D.C. fire chief, deputy mayor

    The D.C. Council member with oversight of the fire department on Tuesday called for the resignations of the fire chief and the deputy mayor for public safety and justice, saying the administration has failed to present a plan to address chronic troubles with emergency response.

  • D.C. Council to investigate emergency response failures

    D.C. public safety officials will be asked Monday to account for several high-profile failures of the city's emergency response system, including the death of a man who collapsed across the street from a fire station and was refused aid.

  • Fire Chief Kenneth Ellerbe touts his changes for EMS service as a way to provide better service, denying that it is for staffing or budgetary reasons. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)

    D.C. firefighter files assault report against chief

    A D.C. firefighter filed a police complaint accusing Fire Chief Kenneth B. Ellerbe of assault, pointing to an encounter last week when the chief showed up on the scene of an ambulance fire and grabbed the man's cell phone from his hand.

  • Civilian paramedics to be hired in break with D.C. policy

    The D.C. fire department is set to hire civilian paramedics to address dire shortages in its emergency medical services workforce — moving forward with a major policy shift that reverses decades of efforts to establish an agency whose employees are cross-trained as both medics and firefighters.

  • Police to investigate two fires aboard D.C. ambulances

    City officials have asked police to investigate two fires that occurred Tuesday aboard D.C. ambulances amid a series of embarrassing failures with the District's emergency medical fleet that has affected everyone from regular residents to the president of the United States.

  • Deputy Mayor Paul A. Quander Jr. said private companies will provide emergency medical service at Nationals games and Verizon Center events. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

    D.C. fire department's ambulance fleet decimated by summer heat

    Widespread ambulance breakdowns brought on by high summer temperatures have overwhelmed the D.C. fire department — causing it to send 22 ambulances to other agency's mechanics for repairs and to outsource coverage of special events to private ambulance companies for the coming weeks, according to agency officials.

  • "I've seen weekends when we've had as many as 40 officers held out of service on hospital details guarding prisoners," Chief Cathy L. Lanier said Monday at a D.C. Council hearing. (The Washington Times)

    Cathy Lanier: D.C. police with arrestees in hospitals is a staffing drain

    D.C. police officers are spending too much time in hospitals, Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy L. Lanier says. But the problem isn't officers getting hurt on the job, it's officers being sent to hospitals to guard people who have been arrested.

  • If an emergency hit the District, as it did Boston, "it would be almost impossible for many off-duty workers, who would be desperately needed, to respond in a timely manner," Mayor Vincent C. Gray wrote to D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson. (The Washington Times)

    Vincent Gray's team clarifies remarks on handling disasters

    Officials within the D.C. mayor's administration spent much of Monday clarifying comments made by Mayor Vincent C. Gray about whether the fire department could effectively respond to a disaster such as the recent Boston Marathon bombings.

  • Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times

    D.C. Council grills fire chief on recent failed responses

    Skeptical D.C. Council members demanded answers from the city's fire chief Thursday on what they said were serious and systemic problems with the department in the wake of a string of failed responses to emergency calls.

  • 7 face discipline after failed response to injured D.C. police officer

    Three D.C. ambulance crews and a supervisory officer are facing possible discipline for failing to follow department protocols the night a police officer was struck by a car and no city ambulances were available to transport him to a hospital, according to an investigative report released Thursday.

  • Plan for two D.C. ambulances in reserve seen as too little, too late

    The head of the D.C. firefighters' union says a plan to keep two fully stocked, reserve ambulances ready to be put on the street in case others have mechanical problems is too little, too late.

  • Fire Chief Kenneth Ellerbe touts his changes for EMS service as a way to provide better service, denying that it is for staffing or budgetary reasons. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)

    D.C. fire officials address ambulance problems in bizarre press event

    The D.C. fire department now has two fully-stocked, reserve ambulances ready to be put on the street in case others have mechanical problems — a new tactic meant to prevent an incident such as occurred Tuesday, when several ambulances had mechanical problems and none were available to transport a police officer injured in a hit-and-run to a hospital.

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