Topic - Peggy Blumenthal

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  • **FILE** Reyes Jiang of China talks Nov. 9, 2012, with Alexus Hall during Cultural Coffee Hour that was hosted by the Japanese Student Association on the campus of Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind. (Associated Press)

    U.S. colleges look to foreign students

    New figures out Monday show international enrollment at U.S. colleges and universities grew nearly 6 percent last year, driven by a 23-percent increase from China, even as total enrollment was leveling out. But perhaps more revealing is where much of the growth is concentrated: big, public land-grant colleges, notably in the Midwest.

  • Kedao Wang, of Shanghai, is a senior at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. New figures out Monday show international enrollment at U.S. colleges and universities grew by nearly 6 percent last year, driven by a 23-percent increase in students from China. (Associated Press)

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    Want to see how quickly the look and business model of American public universities are changing? Visit a place like Indiana University. Five years ago, there were 87 undergraduates from China on its idyllic campus in Bloomington. This year: 2,224.

  • **FILE** Wang Chengdong, a Chinese student in the Executive MBA program, works June 28, 2011, in a library study room at Missouri State University in Springfield, Mo. (Associated Press/The News-Leader)

    Motives of foreign student recruiters questioned

    As American universities welcome ever-greater numbers of international students, some professors and admissions counselors are questioning the motives of the very professionals who have helped attract so many foreign scholars to their campuses.

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Quotations
  • Public universities hit hard by state funding cuts "really are starting to realize the tuition from international students makes it possible for them to continue offering scholarships and financial aid to domestic students," said Peggy Blumenthal, senior counselor at IIE, the private nonprofit that publishes the annual "Open Doors" study.

    U.S. colleges look to foreign students →

  • "I think that's important," Blumenthal said of the trend of international students moving beyond the most famous schools and into state schools, community colleges and liberal arts colleges. "They need to know that America's as diverse as we know it is."

    U.S. colleges look to foreign students →

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