Pepco Holdings

Latest Pepco Holdings Items
  • An electrical engineer from Pepco electric company attempts to repair and replace downed power lines, in Bethesda, Md., Monday, July 2, 2012. The storm left hundreds of thousands of people without power and caused wide spread property damage. (Andrew S. Geraci/The Washington Times)

    Progress being made in power restoration

    Nearly 14,000 Montgomery County residents were still without power at the close of business Thursday, six days after last Friday's violent storm that wiped out power to more than 1 million customers throughout the region.


  • Pepco says it has restored power to 90 percent

    Pepco says it has restored power to 90 percent of those affected by last week's storms, beating its own estimate for getting power back to customers.


  • KELLNER: Utilities' Web smarts could have helped powerless

    One day after having electricity restored at home, it's beginning to seem like a very bad dream: About 81 hours without power, with sweltering temperatures and the contents of a refrigerator-freezer relocated to the trash.


  • Utility workers secure power lines as their team repairs electrical wires downed by fallen trees in Springfield, Va. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    Pepco brags it beat power-restoration deadline by 2 days

    Pepco boasted on Wednesday it had "beat by two days" its estimate for restoring power to 90 percent of its customers in the wake of a fierce storm that devastated the region on Friday night.


  • Utility workers secure power lines on a pole as their team repairs lines downed by fallen trees in Springfield. (Associated Press)

    Power finally back on for 90% of Pepco's customers

    Pepco boasted on Wednesday it had "beat by two days" its estimate for restoring power to 90 percent of its customers in the wake of a fierce storm that devastated the region on Friday night.


  • A utility worker clears a downed tree in Springfield, Va., Sunday, July 1, 2012. A severe storm late Friday knocked out power to approximately one million residents, traffic signals and businesses in the  region.  (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    Fourth day of storm recovery brings more power customers online

    Utility crews made significant progress Tuesday restoring power to homes without electricity since Friday night's storm, but officials in several jurisdictions announced they were canceling Independence Day celebrations as the recovery continues.


  • D.C. Mayor Vincent C. Gray stressed accountability as he swore in Sandra Mattavous-Frye on Tuesday to her reappointment as the D.C. People's Counsel, an advocate for ratepayers in their disputes with utilities such as Pepco. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

    D.C. Council member calls for Pepco investigation

    D.C. Council member Mary M. Cheh is calling for a formal investigation into Pepco's response to the storm that thrashed the D.C. area Friday and caused widespread power outages, a multiday trial that has city leaders talking about a piece-by-piece effort to bury power lines underground despite an astronomical price tag.


  • With questions roiling about his company's inability to get the power back on, Pepco President Joseph Rigby's overall pay doubled last year, despite not getting an increase in his base salary. (Associated Press)

    Pepco boss got megawatt pay boost despite problems

    Pepco's chief executive, Joseph Rigby, didn't get a salary increase last year because of "customer reliability issues," but he still managed to double his overall compensation, regulatory filings show.


  • A pedestrian takes a look at downed trees blocking the entrance of a house in Baltimore on July 2, 2012, after a severe storm swept through the region four days earlier. Power outages left many to contend with stifling homes and spoiled food over the weekend as temperatures approached or exceeded 100 degrees. (Associated Press)

    1.4 million still blacked out after broad U.S. storm

    Utility crews struggled to catch up with a backlog of millions of people without electricity for a fourth hot day Tuesday as frustration grew and authorities feared the toll of 22 storm deaths could rise because of stifling conditions and generator fumes.


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